Smith & Wesson Won’t Comply With Calif. ‘Microstamping’ Law

Gun manufacturer Smith & Wesson refused Thursday to comply with California’s controversial “microstamping” law, causing more of its products to fall off the state’s permissible firearms list and be ineligible for sale.

APphoto_Gun Show Las Vegas

Trade show attendees examine handguns and rifles in the Smith & Wesson display boot at the Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Tradeshow in Las Vegas on Jan. 14. (Credit: Associated Press)

In a two-page statement on its website, Smith & Wesson criticized Assembly Bill 1471, which requires new or redesigned semiautomatic weapons to carry microstamping technology, imprinting its make, model and serial number onto shell casings when a bullet is fired.

Though the law was passed in 2007, language in the legislation stipulated it would go into effect when the necessary technology was widely available. It was not enacted until May 2013.

Critics argue that the technology is flawed. In its statement, Smith & Wesson said “a number of studies have indicated that microstamping is unreliable, serves no safety purpose, is cost prohibitive and, most importantly, is not proven to aid in preventing or solving crimes.”

Click here to read the full story on LATimes.com.