Bryan Stow Civil Case: Jurors at Impasse but Return to Deliberations

After about 20 hours of deliberations, jurors said they had not been able to reach a verdict in the Bryan Stow civil lawsuit against the Los Angeles Dodgers and former owner Frank McCourt, they told the judge Wednesday.

Stow, a Giants fan, was severely beaten in a Dodger Stadium parking lot following a game against the San Francisco Giants on March 31, 2011.

His lawsuit accused the Dodgers and McCourt of failing to provide proper security and lighting on the night Stow was beaten.

mccourt

“Like all Dodger fans, I was appalled at the criminal behavior of Sanchez and Norwood. Make no mistake, they are the parties responsible for this tragic incident,” Frank McCourt said outside Los Angeles Superior Court on June 13, 2014. (Credit: KTLA)

The jury of six men and six women listened to 20 days of testimony during the 4 1/2-week closely watched trial, which began on May 27.

The jury was handed the case on Thursday, June 26.

In court on Wednesday, the Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Victor E. Chavez told jurors he had heard they had had a difficult time reaching agreement.

Jurors said they had not been able to reach agreement on any of the eight questions before them, and were still stuck on the first question. Additional arguments from attorneys would not help, they said.

The judge called attorneys for both sides into his chambers, but returned to read jury instructions to the jurors again.

Chavez implored them to continue deliberating, but said if they remain deadlocked, a mistrial could be declared.

Jurors returned to deliberations about 3:15 p.m., then buzzed to say they had a question for the judge. Deliberations concluded at 4 p.m., and jurors were ordered to return to the courthouse on Thursday morning.

Stow, a paramedic from Santa Cruz, suffered brain damage and permanent disability in the attack. His parents, who were sitting in the front row of the downtown L.A. courtroom Wednesday, appeared very disappointed.

He was seeking more than $36 million in economic damages for lost earnings and medical expenses, plus an unnamed sum for compensation for pain and suffering.

Stow’s mother Ann said Tuesday that if the family did not win, they may have to cut out paying for a nighttime caregiver for Stow.

A special needs trust from fundraising events pays for Stow’s care, she said, but it has a limited funds.

Stow, a father of two, was wearing a Giants jersey when he was beaten by Dodgers fans Marvin Norwood and Louie Sanchez.

Norwood and Sanchez have both pleaded guilty in the attack.

A Los Angeles Police Department officer looks at fans inside Dodger Stadium during the home opener against the Pittsburgh Pirates on April 10, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Security was high at the stadium for the home opener after Bryan Stow was beaten into a coma in a Dodger Stadium parking lot following the home opener in March of 2011. (Credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

A Los Angeles Police Department officer looks at fans inside Dodger Stadium during the home opener against the Pittsburgh Pirates on April 10, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Security was high at the stadium for the home opener after Bryan Stow was beaten into a coma in a Dodger Stadium parking lot following the home opener in March of 2011. (Credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

 

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