Watch Live: Firefight Continues Against Raging Sand Fire
Live Video: Watch Day 1 of Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia
IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR DISH SUBSCRIBERS – SERVICE INTERRUPTION – CLICK HERE

Thunderstorms Could Hit Area as Drought-Stricken SoCal Gets Much-Needed Summer Rain

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

One week after a swimmer was killed in a freak lightning strike at Venice Beach, forecasters on Sunday were warning those planning to be outdoors during the humid, muggy day about the threat of potential thunderstorms in the Southern California area.

A summer storm blew in to Southern California on Aug. 3, 2014., bringing with it some much needed rain to the parched region. (Credit: CasperNews)

A summer storm blew in to Southern California on Aug. 3, 2014., bringing with it some much needed rain to the parched region. (Credit: CasperNews)

Scattered showers hit the region overnight, bringing as much as quarter-of-an-inch of much-needed rain to the drought-stricken state.

The National Weather Service warned of thunderstorms in the mountains of Los Angeles and Ventura counties that could bring brief heavy downpours, gusty and erratic winds, and potentially deadly lightning.

As a result, campers, hikers and beachgoers were asked to closely monitor the weather, and anyone who heard thunder was urged to stop what they were doing and and immediately head indoors.

“People planning outdoor activities from the mountains and deserts to the beaches should keep their eyes to the sky,” the weather service cautioned.

Last Sunday, 20-year-old Nick Fagnano died after being hit by lightning while he was in the ocean at Venice Beach. The sudden strike also injured about a dozen others and left seven people hospitalized.

In addition to thunderstorms, residents were also being warned about potential flash floods in the region.

A Flash Flood Warning was in effect in central Riverside County until 2:30 p.m., while a Flash Flood Watch was scheduled through 6 p.m. in the L.A. County mountains and Antelope Valley, according to the weather service.

Motorists were also being encouraged to not drive across flooded roadways.