FAA No-Fly Zones Over Disneyland, Disney World Face New Scrutiny

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Throngs of visitors travel down Disneyland's Main Street USA in this file photo. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Throngs of visitors travel down Disneyland's Main Street USA in this file photo. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

The “Happiest Place on Earth” has some of the strictest airspace in America.

One day last month, an odd pair of security alerts appeared on the Federal Aviation Administration’s website, reminding pilots that they are not allowed to fly into two areas in Southern California and central Florida.

An FAA map shows the flight restrictions over Disneyland, which were put in place in 2003.

An FAA map shows the flight restrictions over Disneyland, which were first put in place in 2003.

The sky over Disneyland in Anaheim and Walt Disney World in Orlando is “national defense airspace.” Intentionally violating Mickey and Minnie’s airspace, the alerts warn, could result in interception, interrogation and federal prosecution.

These no-fly zones are known as temporary flight restrictions, like the ones that surround the president when he travels or those put in place above Ferguson, Mo., during protests over the summer. Wildfires, air shows and large sporting events regularly get temporary flight restrictions.

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Pedestrians walk near the entrance to Disneyland Resort on Feb. 19, 2009, in Anaheim. (Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)

Pedestrians walk near the entrance to Disneyland Resort on Feb. 19, 2009, in Anaheim. (Credit: David McNew/Getty Images)