LAPD Underreported Violent Crimes: Reforms Now Underway

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Following an L.A. Times investigation that found police had seriously underreported violent crimes, the LAPD has launched reforms meant to overhaul its system for classifying crimes.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck addresses a July 2013 news conference where he and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced midyear crime statistics. (Credit: Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times)

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck addresses a July 2013 news conference where he and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced midyear crime statistics. (Credit: Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times)

Department officials will brief the Police Commission, which oversees the LAPD, on its new Data Integrity Unit at a meeting Tuesday morning.

The changes, which focus on enhanced training for officers and increased accountability, come after the investigation this summer that found the department significantly underreported the number of serious assaults and other violent offenses that occurred in the city.

After The Times’ report, LAPD officials created a Data Integrity Unit and tasked it with carrying out the reforms. Over the last few weeks, the unit’s small staff has put about 400 station supervisors, senior detectives and clerical staff through a four-hour training course on how to properly classify crimes to be in line with federal reporting guidelines, officials said in an interview this week.

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