Summer Storm Brings Heavy Rains to Southern California; Flash Floods Hit Inland Empire

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As the remnants of Tropical Depression Dolores continued to move north on Saturday, heavy rains soaked parts of Southern California and led to flooding in parts of the Inland Empire.

Work crews are seen on a street in Moreno Valley after heavy rains resulted in flash flooding on Sunday, July 19, 2015. (Credit: KTLA)

Work crews are seen on a street in Moreno Valley after heavy rains resulted in flash flooding on Sunday, July 19, 2015. (Credit: KTLA)

Meanwhile, the National Weather Service warned that conditions could also bring thunderstorms, lightning, strong winds, high surf and even hail to the region through Monday.

Residents of San Bernardino and Riverside counties reported flash flooding in Redlands, Wrightwood and Jurupa Valley after the National Weather Service’s doppler radar showed a cluster of thunderstorms stretching from the western Inland Empire to the High Desert.

Photos and videos submitted by KTLA viewers showed deluged streets and highways in Hesperia, Victorville and Colton.

In Moreno Valley, Christopher Gould said he helped rescue nine drivers who got stuck on flooded roadways.

“It was just unbelievable,” he said. “There was a lot of people that were trying to still go through it, even though you couldn’t.”

At the home that Orlando Sanchez moved into just seven months ago, he surveyed the damage caused by floodwaters that spilled though a fence in the backyard.

“Welcome to the neighborhood,” he said with a chuckle.

He described the 3-foot torrent that forced him to evacuate his family from the house.

“As I approached the backyard I noticed water rushing from the top of the hill,” he said. “It was coming pretty rapid.”

The wild weather was predicted one day after a lighting storm prompted the temporary closure of all Los Angeles County beaches and Huntington Beach, and initially left more than 10,000 customers without power in the L.A. area.

All of the impacted beaches were reopened by Saturday night.

As of 11 p.m. the same day, Department of Water and Power crews were working to restore electricity to more than 4,700 customers impacted by the storm, according to a tweet from LADWP.

It was not immediately clear when service would be fully restored. By early afternoon, more than 1,000 customers remained without power, the utility tweeted.

Saturday’s storm also brought record daily and monthly rainfall totals to the drought-stricken region, according to the weather service. The highest total in the L.A. and Ventura area was in Lancaster, which received 0.65 inches of rain.

KTLA viewer Michael Kramer snapped this photo of a lightning strike in Big Bear.

KTLA viewer Michael Kramer snapped this photo of a lightning strike in Big Bear.

Other cities experiencing record-highs for July 18 included Downtown L.A., Los Angeles International Airport, Woodland Hills, Oxnard, Camarillo and Palmdale.

In addition to more wet weather, the remnants of the tropical depression were expected to bring high surf and strong rip currents to local beaches, scattered showers, thunderstorms, small hail, dangerous cloud-to-ground lightning, and gusty and erratic winds that could last into Monday, forecasters said.

The weather service warned that showers and thunderstorms have the potential to bring heavy rainfall capable of producing flash flooding and debris flows, especially near recent burn areas in Glendora and Camarillo Springs.

By noon, thunderstorms were beginning to form over L.A. County mountains., the weather service tweeted.

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