Magnitude-2.7 Earthquake Among 50 Aftershocks After 4.4 Temblor in San Bernardino Area

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Following a series of aftershocks, a 2.7-magnitude earthquake hit the Devore area Wednesday morning, some 12 hours after a 4.4 temblor rattled many Southern California residents.

A preliminary 2.8-magnitude earthquake hit the Devore area on Dec. 30, 2015, about 12 hours after a 4.4 temblor shook the area. (Credit: USGS)

A preliminary 2.8-magnitude earthquake hit the Devore area on Dec. 30, 2015, about 12 hours after a 4.4 temblor shook the area. (Credit: USGS)

More than 50 small earthquakes occurred near Devore after the 4.4 quake struck around 5:48 p.m. Tuesday near a residential development called Rosena Ranch, northwest of the San Bernardino area, according to the U.S. Geological Survey and Southern California Earthquake Data Center.

Anywhere between zero and 50 aftershocks was “normal” within hours of a 4.4-magnitude quake, according to seismologist Lucy Jones, with the USGS and Caltech.

The largest aftershock was a 3.8, which occurred within minutes of the initial temblor, and the smallest was a .4, hitting around 4:47 a.m. Wednesday

The largest quake on Wednesday happened around 6:15 a.m. 2 miles south of Devore, 4 miles west-northwest of Muscoy, 6 miles north-northwest of Rialto and 7 miles north-northwest of San Bernardino, according to the USGS. It had a depth of 4.6 miles.

Following the initial 4.4 temblor, numerous people reported feeling shaking from as far away as San Diego, Anaheim, Long Beach and Burbank.

Officers in the area were also "busy with the volume of alarm calls following the quake," according to San Bernardino police Chief Jarrod Burguan.

A "ShakeMap" shows the distribution of people's response to an earthquake near Devore on Dec. 29, 2015. (Credit: USGS)

A "ShakeMap" shows the distribution of people's response to an earthquake near Devore on Dec. 29, 2015. (Credit: USGS)

Multiple people also asked Jones on Twitter if a bigger one was coming.

"Like any other" earthquake, the temblor has a 5 percent chance of triggering a larger earthquake, Jones replied.

"Probably only a little bit bigger," Jones tweeted.

No injuries or damage were reported as of 7:40 p.m. Tuesday, Burguan tweeted.

The Los Angeles Fire Department was in “earthquake mode” following the temblor, meaning officials at all 106 fire stations planned to survey the areas their district covered to “ensure safety.”