Oregon Becomes 1st State to Automatically Register Voters Unless They Opt Out

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown appears at an event in Portland on Nov. 10, 2015. On Wednesday, she signed the state's "new motor voter" law.(Credit: Steve Dykes/Getty Images)

Americans are required to register if they want to vote; as of this week, Oregonians will have to register not to.

In front of a packed and cheering audience Monday, Gov. Kate Brown signed a first-in-the-nation bill to automatically register all eligible Oregonians to vote when they obtain or renew a driver’s license or state identification card.

Those who are registered through the new process will be notified by mail and will be given three weeks to take themselves off the voting rolls. If they do not opt out, the secretary of state’s office will mail them a ballot automatically 20 days before any election.

When Brown signed House Bill 2177 into law, she was building on the Beaver State’s history as a ballot-box innovator, which has led to high voter participation. Oregon was the first state in the country to switch to all-mail voting when Ballot Measure 60 was passed in 1998 by a wide margin. Washington state and Colorado later followed suit.

Click here to read the full story on LATimes.com.