Powerful Storm Brings Rain, Snow, Thunderstorms to SoCal

A cold storm system dropped rain and snow on parts of Southern California Monday and prompted forecasters to issue severe thunderstorm and flash flood warnings.

Rain begins to fall in Ventura on March 7, 2016. (Credit: KTLA)

Rain begins to fall in Ventura on March 7, 2016. (Credit: KTLA)

The steadiest rain fell during the morning hours as the front moved through the region, according to the National Weather Service.

Rainfall totals were expected to be between a half inch and one inch, according to the weather service.

A severe thunderstorm warning was issued for parts of Los Angeles and Ventura counties.

A snow covered car is seen in Frazier Park on March 7, 2016. (Credit: KTLA)

A snow covered car is seen in Frazier Park on March 7, 2016. (Credit: KTLA)

The thunderstorms were capable of producing hail and winds in excess of 70 mph, according to the weather service.

Video from Eagle Rock showed a lightning flashing as thunder struck in the background Monday morning.

Severe thunderstorm warnings were also issued for Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

Snow is seen on the ground in Frazier Park on March 7, 2016. (Credit: KTLA)

Snow is seen on the ground in Frazier Park on March 7, 2016. (Credit: KTLA)

Forecasters were calling for thunderstorms to bring short, heavy downpours that could produce mud and debris flows near the burn areas throughout the day.

The Solimar burn area was under a flash flood warning at one point Monday morning.

A winter storm warning was in effect for the Los Angeles and Ventura County mountains Monday.

The storm was expected to bring a significant amount of snow above 6,000 feet, with light snow falling as low as 4,000 feet, the weather service stated.

Snow had already begun to fall in the Frazier Park area Monday morning. Video showed snow covered cars and drivers complained of "white out" like conditions on the roadways.

Forecasters called for snowfall on Interstate 5 near the grapevine Monday afternoon and Monday evening.

Slick roads were expected to result in a slow Monday morning commute. Drivers were encouraged to slow down and allow extra travel time.

Mountain travelers were reminded to carry chains.

Thousands of Southern California Edison and Los Angeles Department of Water and Power customers were left without power as the storm moved through.

Strong north winds were also expected to affect the region Monday night into Tuesday morning.