Oldest Park Ranger in U.S. Back to Work in NorCal After Being Beaten, Robbed

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Two weeks after she was beaten and robbed in her Richmond, Calif., home, Betty Reid Soskin, the nation’s oldest national park ranger, returned to work Tuesday to cheers and hugs.

National Park Service ranger Betty Reid Soskin looks on while working at the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park on Oct. 24, 2013, in Richmond, California. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

National Park Service ranger Betty Reid Soskin looks on while working at the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park on Oct. 24, 2013, in Richmond, California. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Soskin, 94, is a ranger at the Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historical Park in Richmond, where she leads tours and provides a history of women who worked in factories during wartime. She began working with the park service at 85.

On June 27, she was attacked in her Richmond town home and robbed of her prized possessions, including a commemorative coin President Obama gave her in December.

Soskin told KTVU-TV she woke up last month to find a man with a flashlight standing near her. She reached for her cellphone, but he grabbed it from her and they struggled. Her attacker dragged her from the bed through a hallway, where he punched her multiple times on the side of the face.

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