Mystery Surrounds 43 Missing Mexican Students Two Years After Disappearance

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Relatives and friends of the 43 missing missing of Ayotzinapa, wait before experts of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) designated to investigate the disappearance present the first conclusions of their investigation, in Mexico City on September 6, 2015. (Credit: OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)

Two years after 43 Mexican college students vanished in the southwestern city of Iguala, the case remains a grisly mystery and a dark stain on the administration of Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto.

The public anger was on display Monday — the anniversary of the presumed mass killing — in Mexico City, where thousands of protesters took to the streets to demand justice. The 43 students, all young men who had been studying at a teachers college in the rural town of Ayotzinapa, had hijacked buses in hopes of reaching a demonstration, only to be intercepted by local police and never seen again.

Critics allege a coverup reaching to high levels of the Mexican government.

“I can’t believe that we are here, two years later, with the same pain, the same demands,” said protester Patricia Beltran, a 25-year-old student. “The government laughs at people’s pain, but we are here today to tell them that it is not only the parents of the 43, but all of Mexico that insists that this government do its job.”

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