Los Angeles Police Commission Considers Changes in How LAPD Handles Officer-Involved Shootings

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

The Los Angeles Police Commission is considering significant changes in the way the LAPD handles shootings by officers, including releasing information to the public more quickly and expanding training designed to reduce the number of shootings.

The Los Angeles Police Commission's inspector general, Alex Bustamante, and LAPD Chief Charlie Beck listen as a protester speaks at a commission meeting on Oct. 3, 2016. (Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

The Los Angeles Police Commission’s inspector general, Alex Bustamante, and LAPD Chief Charlie Beck listen as a protester speaks at a commission meeting on Oct. 3, 2016. (Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

The proposals, which the civilian panel will weigh next week, include seeking public opinion on releasing videos from those shootings, ensuring the LAPD provides accurate information about the incidents and adding more role-playing scenarios to help officers practice defusing tense encounters without firing their guns.

The proposals come after the commission’s inspector general completed an extensive study, made public Friday, looking at how other major departments deal with police shootings. The report found that some provide the public with more details faster and have embraced training based on real-world scenarios.

How officers use force and how departments share information about deadly encounters are two of the most scrutinized issues in modern-day policing, drawing fresh attention this summer after a series of deadly police shootings across the country.

Click here to read the full story on LATimes.com.