First Rain of Season in SoCal Disrupts Morning Commute; High Heat Forecast to Follow

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The first rain of the season brought slick roads to many of Southern California’s freeways Monday morning.

Drivers navigate slick roads on the rain-soaked 134 Freeway in the Eagle Rock Monday morning. (Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Drivers navigate slick roads on the rain-soaked 134 Freeway in the Eagle Rock Monday morning. (Credit: Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

A weak cold front was responsible for light showers moving into the region overnight, according to the National Weather Service.

The rain was expected to mostly fall during the early morning hours before tapering off Monday afternoon.

Gusty west to southwest winds were then likely to pick up, especially across the mountains and Antelope Valley, the Weather Service stated.

Several crashes were reported along the rain-slickened freeways as commuters made their way to work Monday morning.

A multivehicle crash on the eastbound 91 Freeway in Long Beach prompted the temporary closure of all lanes just before 2 a.m., according to the California Highway Patrol.

A big rig jackknifed on the 110 Freeway in University Park about 1:22 a.m., resulting in a SigAlert for the closure of three southbound lanes.

Authorities investigated a number of crashes Monday morning as rain fell across Southern California. (Credit: Loudlabs)

Authorities investigated a number of crashes Monday morning as rain fell across Southern California. (Credit: Loudlabs)

Another vehicle overturned on the southbound 170 Freeway in North Hollywood about 1:10 a.m.

The cool, wet weather isn’t expected to last long however, as temperatures downtown are forecast to climb back into the 90s and up to 100 by midweek in parts of the region, with Thursday likely being the hottest day.

Record-breaking heat in the region is a possibility, the Los Angeles Times reported, noting that temperatures in Los Angeles and Woodland Hills had the potential to reach at least 100 degrees between Wednesday and Friday.

The combination of expected high heat, Santa Ana and Sundowner winds, and humidity dropping into the single digits has prompted the Weather Service to warn of "extreme fire danger" in parts of L.A., Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.

A fire weather watch is scheduled to be in effect for portions of the southwest part of the state from late Tuesday afternoon through Thursday evening.

Other impacts of the hot, dry conditions included a possible increase of heat-related illnesses, according to the Weather Service.

KTLA's Tracy Bloom contributed to this story.