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Monday’s ‘Supermoon’ is Biggest in Nearly 70 Years

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Vegetation is seen as the 'supermoon' rises over Heho, Myanmar's Shan state, on November 14, 2016. (Credit: YE AUNG THU/AFP/Getty Images)

Vegetation is seen as the ‘supermoon’ rises over Heho, Myanmar’s Shan state, on November 14, 2016. (Credit: YE AUNG THU/AFP/Getty Images)

The biggest and closest “supermoon” in nearly 70 years lit up the sky Monday morning, according to NASA.

A supermoon — also known as a perigee moon — refers broadly to when a full moon is closer to Earth than normal, NASA said.

Nov. 14 will mark the “closest” full moon to date of this century and is expected to peak shortly before 6 a.m., according to Space.com.

Supermoons generally appear to be 14% bigger and 30% brighter than other full moons.

While such moons occur around every 13 months, November’s is a special one.

According to NASA, this month’s supermoon “becomes full within about two hours of perigee—arguably making it an extra-super moon.”

A full moon won’t appear as close to the one this month until Nov. 25, 2034.

A month after the mega-supermoon, another supermoon will rise on December 14.

It too will be a sight to behold, but it’ll also limit our opportunity to see something just as beautiful — a Geminid meteor shower.

The Geminid meteor shower, an annual event, got its name because the meteors look like they’re coming from the constellation of Gemini.