Police Set up Cameras in Kansas Over Concerns of Mountain Lion, Instead Get Images of Pranksters in Costume

Gardner Police Department officials in Kansas shared this image on Facebook on Nov. 28, 2016 taken by a camera meant to capture photos of dangerous wildlife at a local park.

Gardner Police Department officials in Kansas shared this image on Facebook on Nov. 28, 2016 taken by a camera meant to capture photos of dangerous wildlife at a local park.

Police in Kansas who set up a camera after hearing concerns over a mountain lion instead captured images of what appear to be pranksters dressed up in animal costumes.

The Gardner Police Department set up two trail cameras at a local park in an effort to determine if there was a dangerous animal in the area, but they never spotted a mountain lion.

“We were however surprised by some of the images that the cameras did take,” police officials wrote in a Facebook post Monday.

They shared the images captured by the cameras “for your review.”

“We now have another different concern. We are attempting to identify some of the wildlife and activity in these images.”

One image shows a person posing for the camera while wearing a gorilla suit. Another photo shows an interaction between two “gorillas.”

The photos show at least two other costumed creatures that have yet to be identified by authorities.

The camera did manage to capture images of an actual coyote, a skunk and a raccoon.

Police officials graciously thanked the photo subjects for their “sense of humor.”

“We would like to sincerely thank the persons responsible as it made our day when we pulled up what we expected to be hundreds of pictures of coyotes, foxes and raccoons.”

While people often report spotting mountain lions in Kansas, actual sightings are few and far between. The first confirmed mountain lion in modern times was shot and killed in south-central Kansas in 2007, according to the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism.

Before that, the last mountain lion documented in the state was killed in 1904, according to the department.