Laurel Canyon Boulevard to Remain Closed After Concrete Foundation Slides Down Rain-Soaked Hillside

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Laurel Canyon Boulevard will remain closed for a 2 1/4-mile stretch through the western part of the Hollywood Hills after the concrete foundation of an aged home fell down the hillside onto the roadway.

Officials work Jan. 12, 2017, on closed Laurel Canyon Boulevard after a concrete slab fell onto the roadway. (Credit: KTLA)

Officials work Jan. 12, 2017, on closed Laurel Canyon Boulevard after a concrete slab fell onto the roadway. (Credit: KTLA)

Authorities announced Thursday that the closure of the road — a critical surface-street connection with the San Fernando Valley — will continue until safety measures can be implemented.

“This is an all-hands-on-deck situation,” said Los Angeles City Councilman David Ryu, who represents the area.

The road is closed from Sunset Boulevard to Mulholland Drive, except for local access. From Gould Avenue to Kirkwood Drive, no vehicles are allowed at all.

A reopening date depends on weather and safety, Ryu said at a Thursday afternoon news conference near the slide.

Authorities are working on an “alternative traffic plan,” Ryu said. He urged drivers to use freeways and other major roads. Go to emergency.lacity.org/laurelcanyonclosure for information, he said.

Rocks and debris have continued falling onto the roadside Thursday after a home at 8189 Gould Ave. lost part of its foundation and balcony Wednesday morning.

A patio was threatening to fall from a home toward Laurel Canyon Boulevard below on Jan. 11, 2017. (Credit: KTLA)

A patio was threatening to fall from a home toward Laurel Canyon Boulevard below on Jan. 11, 2017. (Credit: KTLA)

A Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman said Wednesday there was concern the entire home could fall down the rain-soaked slope onto Laurel Canyon Boulevard below. The home has been red-tagged; a property to the north has been yellow-tagged and residents instructed not to go onto their deck, said Jeff Napier of the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety.

Investigators haven't even determined if it's safe for municipal personnel to go into the structure, Napier said.

"Rain is not good with soil. It doesn't mix with soil," Napier said. "We're concerned. We're still evaluating both structures."

Authorities intend to meet with the owner of the home to determine responsibility for work to ensure safety at the property. The home was built in 1926, according to online property records.

Laurel Canyon Boulevard has been closed to traffic before -- in 2005 -- a city official said.