After Monday’s Storm, Downtown L.A. Rainfall Level Exceeds Normal Precipitation Total for a Full Water Year

As of Monday, downtown Los Angeles has received more rain than it does on average in a full water year, which runs Oct. 1 to Sept. 30.

Crossing guard Maria Brito escorts pedestrians at Ford Boulevard and Verona Street in East Los Angeles during morning showers on Feb. 6, 2017. (Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Crossing guard Maria Brito escorts pedestrians at Ford Boulevard and Verona Street in East Los Angeles during morning showers on Feb. 6, 2017. (Credit: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

The National Weather Service on Monday afternoon said the downtown weather station, which is at USC, had recorded 15.44 inches of rain as of 2 p.m.

In a normal “water year,” the site gets 14.93 inches of rain.

Precipitation in California is tracked in annual periods that begin at the start of the traditional rainy season. There was high hope that the El Niño in the 2015-2016 water year would bring a reversal in fortunes for the drought-plagued state, but it was disappointingly dry.

This winter, after five years of drought, the state has seen heavy rain and snow. Statewide snowpack in the Sierra Nevada, a crucial source of drinking water, was at 173 percent of normal as of Monday.

By the end of January, nearly half the state was out of drought, according to the federal U.S. Drought Monitor. A year earlier, more than 95 percent of the state was in drought.

Los Angeles County remains in severe to extreme drought, however.