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After 6-Month Surge in Water Levels, Flood Risk Begins to Ease in California

A car is submerged along Green Valley Road near Folsom Dam in Folsom, Calif., on Jan. 11. (Credit: Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

A car is submerged along Green Valley Road near Folsom Dam in Folsom, Calif., on Jan. 11. (Credit: Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

For the first time in 193 days, no federally monitored rivers in California or Nevada are flooding or at risk of flooding, according to climate scientists.

From Jan. 4 to July 15, at least one California or Nevada river fed by the Sierra Nevada was at, or above flood monitoring stage, following an historically wet winter.

A non-leveed river reaches monitor stage when it rises above its normal flow for that time of year and begins to wash over low-lying banks and causes minor flooding. Flood stage is when it’s a full inundation that causes significant damage to the area.

For a leveed river, monitor stage is when the water is several feet below the tops of the banks, but high enough where local officials are required to begin monitoring the river around the clock.

Read the full story on LATimes.com