L.A. Warns Homebuilders — But Not Residents — of Traffic Pollution Health Risks

For five years, Los Angeles has been issuing health advisories to housing developers, warning of the dangers of building near freeways. But when the city moved to alert residents as well, officials rejected it.

Planning commissioners axed a provision to require traffic pollution signs on some new, multifamily developments from an environmental ordinance on the grounds that it would burden developers and hurt market values.

Traffic on the 101 Freeway passes by the recently built Santa Cecilia Apartments in Boyle Heights. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Traffic on the 101 Freeway passes by the recently built Santa Cecilia Apartments in Boyle Heights. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

Critics say the 2015 decision illustrates city officials’ reluctance to take even incremental action to protect public health if they believe it will discourage home-building.

Marta Segura, who served on the planning commission at the time, said scrapping the sign mandate was a mistake.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.