Activists Protest 33-Story Apartment Tower on the Edge of L.A.’s Skid Row

Skid row residents have long feared that upscale development spilling over from other parts of downtown Los Angeles would spark rampant gentrification and pose a threat to their 50-block neighborhood, one of the city’s poorest.

Protesters demonstrated against construction of a 33-story apartment tower on the border of skid row on Friday. (Gale Holland/Los Angeles Times)

Protesters demonstrated against construction of a 33-story apartment tower on the border of skid row on Friday. (Gale Holland/Los Angeles Times)

Downtown residents and businesses see skid row as a prime spot to build modest and workforce housing to complement the largely expensive lofts and apartments in the rest of the central core.

They also want to see the booming Arts District and Historic Core, now separated by skid row, united in one resurgent downtown, with restaurants and other commercial businesses.

Even as lofts and restaurants crept into the edges of skid row, 2,000 homeless people have continued to cling to skid row streets in tents and makeshift lean-tos. While the city and county have pledged $1.2 billion to homeless housing, and $355 million annually for services, the construction has met resistance and will take years to complete.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.