Two-Thirds of Streets in L.A. Are Swept Infrequently, City Audit Finds

While weekly street sweeping is a way of life on one-third of Los Angeles streets, to the chagrin of residents chasing scarce parking, the rest of the city’s roads can go a year or more without being cleaned, according to a city controller audit released Wednesday.

Streets that prohibit on-street parking during street sweeping are cleaned regularly, but the remaining two-thirds of city routes are cleaned as infrequent as once a year, auditors said Wednesday. (Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Streets that prohibit on-street parking during street sweeping are cleaned regularly, but the remaining two-thirds of city routes are cleaned as infrequent as once a year, auditors said Wednesday. (Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

The city’s lumbering yellow vehicles sweep the same 34% of streets every week — routes that are identified through signs that prohibit on-street parking during street-sweeping hours, the audit found.

The remaining ones are swept when employees get to them — “sometimes, less than once a year” — or when someone complains, Controller Ron Galperin wrote. In other cases, he said in an interview, streets are swept only if an employee has enough time, or space for more debris in the sweeping vehicle.

“Sometimes, the squeaky wheel gets the grease,” Galperin said. The Bureau of Street Services’ approach to sweeping the majority of city streets “was not at all clear,” he said.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.