U.S., Mexico Will Work Together in Attempt to Stem Migration From Central America

The United States and Mexico are teaming up in a new effort to stem the flow of immigrants from Central America, even as President Trump carries out policy changes that critics argue could spur insecurity in the region and drive more people north.

Honduran migrants warm themselves next to a campfire near train tracks in the community of Caborca in Sonora state, Mexico, on Jan. 13, 2017. (Credit: Alfredo Estrella / AFP / Getty Images)

Honduran migrants warm themselves next to a campfire near train tracks in the community of Caborca in Sonora state, Mexico, on Jan. 13, 2017. (Credit: Alfredo Estrella / AFP / Getty Images)

In recent years, more people entering the U.S. illegally have come from Central American countries than from Mexico, with more than 200,000 Central Americans detained at the border in 2016.

The new initiative aims to discourage people from leaving Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala by funding projects over the next six months to improve the economies and security situation in those countries while reducing corruption.

“We’re taking on what we both recognize as the drivers of mass migration,” said Mark Green, the administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development, who announced the collaboration Thursday after meeting with his counterparts in Mexico City.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

A soldier stands guard on a street in El Salvador, where high murder rates are seen as one reason why migrants have crossed in large numbers to the U.S. in recent years. (Credit: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

A soldier stands guard on a street in El Salvador, where high murder rates are seen as one reason why migrants have crossed in large numbers to the U.S. in recent years. (Credit: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)