Tradition and Deals Still Drawing Thanksgiving Shoppers Into Stores

Jay Pujalte, 45, spent three nights in a tent outside the Atwater Village Best Buy. With a rug for comfort and his wife and daughter for company, Pujalte was willing to wait to find a deal — and an experience — that couldn’t be had online.

Customers fill their shopping carts with laptops at Best Buy just after the Atwater Village store opened on Thanksgiving on Nov. 23, 2017. (Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Customers fill their shopping carts with laptops at Best Buy just after the Atwater Village store opened on Thanksgiving on Nov. 23, 2017. (Credit: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Over the years, e-commerce and ever-earlier sales have eroded Black Friday’s prominence as the main barometer of the holiday shopping season. But Thanksgiving night shopping still holds mystique for consumers.

A recent PwC consumer survey found that 58 percent of shoppers planned to go out and browse for bargains after eating their turkey. Last year, only 40 percent of shoppers said they would shop on Thanksgiving night.

Some choose to shop in brick-and-mortar stores to be able to see and touch what they are buying. Some, as Pujalte said, want to capture “the shopping spirit.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.