Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder Possibly Stabilizing in U.S., New Study Finds

The White House is lit in blue in honor of World Autism Awareness Day in Washington, April 2, 2017. (Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

The White House is lit in blue in honor of World Autism Awareness Day in Washington, April 2, 2017. (Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Researchers have a new reason to believe that the prevalence of autism spectrum disorders in the U.S. has reached a plateau.

The evidence comes from the National Health Interview Survey, which polls American households about a variety of conditions. When a participating family includes children, one of those kids is selected at random to be included in the interview.

A new question was added to the survey in 2014: “Has a doctor or health professional ever told you that [the child] had autism, Asperger’s disorder, pervasive developmental disorder, or autism spectrum disorder?”

Between 2014 and 2016, this question was answered for 30,502 children ages 3 to 17. In 711 cases, the answer was “yes.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.