Proposed Legislation Would Allow California Special Needs Students to Use Medical Marijuana in School

Workers trim the buds of marijuana plants at Alternative Solutions, a DC-area medical marijuana producer, on April 20, 2016. (Credit: Brendan Smialowski / AFP / Getty Images)

Workers trim the buds of marijuana plants at Alternative Solutions, a DC-area medical marijuana producer, on April 20, 2016. (Credit: Brendan Smialowski / AFP / Getty Images)

California minors with special needs or severe disabilities who rely on marijuana for medical purposes would be allowed to use the drug at their school under legislation introduced this week by state Sen. Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo).

The measure would allow a parent or guardian to administer the drug in the form of oil, capsules, tinctures, liquids or topical creams on school campuses where the practice has been approved by the county board of education, Hill said.

Students in kindergarten through 12th grade are currently prohibited by law from taking medical cannabis on school campuses, so parents have to take their children off campus to administer the medicine.

“This legislation is about giving students access to the medicine they need so they have a better chance for success in the classroom and in the community,” Hill said.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.