President’s Attorney Used Trump Organization Email in Stormy Daniels Deal

President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer used his Trump Organization email account to communicate details of a payment transfer to adult film star Stormy Daniels, who allegedly had an affair with the President before his time in office, Daniels’ attorney confirmed to CNN Friday.

Michael Cohen, President Trump's personal lawyer arrives at the Hart Senate Office Building to be interviewed by the Senate Intelligence Committee on Sept. 19, 2017. (Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Michael Cohen, President Trump’s personal lawyer arrives at the Hart Senate Office Building to be interviewed by the Senate Intelligence Committee on Sept. 19, 2017. (Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Michael Avenatti provided an email to CNN in which Michael Cohen confirmed the transfer to Daniels’ former attorney, Keith Davidson. In the email, both Cohen’s personal email account and trumporg.com email account were used. The deposit was confirmed to Cohen by a First Republic Bank employee.

Avenatti, speaking on MSNBC, said Cohen’s use of his business email to conduct this transaction could be an indication that he was acting in an official capacity as a legal counsel to Trump when he transferred the money to Daniels, whose legal name is Stephanie Clifford.

While this development brings the payment to Daniels closer to Trump himself, it is not proof that he knew about it. Any involvement by Trump would indicate the payment was an in-kind campaign contribution which was not disclosed to the Federal Election Commission, which would be a violation of federal law, according to Paul S. Ryan, a campaign finance attorney who works for Common Cause.

The email does not say where the funds originated from.

NBC News first reported Cohen’s use of the email account.

The day after the email, Cohen wired money from First Republic Bank to Davidson’s bank account, according to NBC News.

Cohen and Davidson did not respond to requests for comment from CNN. First Republic Bank declined to comment to the network.

Trump’s 2017 financial disclosures listed an account at First Republic Bank, valued between $15,001 and $50,000.

Cohen also regularly used that same email account to negotiate with Clifford last year before she signed a nondisclosure agreement, NBC News reported.

Last month, Cohen said he wired Clifford $130,000 of his own money right before the 2016 election in exchange for her silence about the alleged affair.

He has denied the Trump Organization’s involvement in the payment, and both Cohen and the White House have denied any sexual encounter between the President and Clifford.

“In a private transaction in 2016, I used my own personal funds to facilitate a payment of $130,000 to Ms. Stephanie Clifford,” Cohen said in a statement in February. “Neither the Trump Organization nor the Trump campaign was a party to the transaction with Ms. Clifford, and neither reimbursed me for the payment, either directly or indirectly.”

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said Wednesday that “arbitration was won in the President’s favor” regarding the case. The statement is an admission that the nondisclosure agreement exists and that it directly involves Trump. It was the first time the White House had admitted the President was involved in any way with Clifford.

Clifford filed suit against Trump on Tuesday, alleging that he never signed a hush agreement regarding the alleged affair and therefore the agreement is void.