In Ruling for Victim in 2009 UCLA Stabbing, California Supreme Court Says Universities May Be Liable for Failing to Protect Students

UCLA's campus is shown in a file photo.(Credit: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

UCLA's campus is shown in a file photo.(Credit: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times)

The California Supreme Court, reviving a lawsuit against UCLA, decided Thursday that the state’s colleges may be held liable for failing to protect students from violence in classrooms and during “curricular” activities.

Citing the 2007 Virginia Tech killings, the state high court unanimously agreed that a former UCLA student who was stabbed by a classmate in a campus laboratory in 2009 should be able to try to show at trial that UCLA breached a legal duty to protect her from foreseeable violence.

“Students are comparatively vulnerable and dependent on their colleges for a safe environment,” Justice Carol A. Corrigan wrote for the court. ”

Katherine Rosen, the stabbing victim, said in her lawsuit that UCLA knew her attacker was suffering from paranoid delusions, had committed previous violence and had told a teaching assistant that he believed she was insulting him.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.