Proposed State Bill Would Loosen Restrictions on Building Heights and Parking, Transforming Some L.A. Neighborhoods

For decades, the question of where Los Angeles should build housing has been a local matter.

Real estate developers have mostly relied on an elaborate web of city zoning rules to figure out how tall a new residential building can be, how many parking spaces it must have, and how many homes can be built on a particular piece of property.

A bill in Sacramento could "upzone" much of L.A., allowing a greater number of four- to eight-story apartments and condominiums to go up near rail and bus routes. Above, a multistory residential project is under construction at Cesar Chavez Avenue and Broadway near Chinatown. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

A bill in Sacramento could “upzone” much of L.A., allowing a greater number of four- to eight-story apartments and condominiums to go up near rail and bus routes. Above, a multistory residential project is under construction at Cesar Chavez Avenue and Broadway near Chinatown. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Now, a bill under consideration in Sacramento would upend that arrangement, allowing multistory apartments and condominiums in neighborhoods where city leaders have long prohibited them. Senate Bill 827, written by state Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco), would loosen or eliminate restrictions on height, density, parking and design for residential properties near major rail and bus stops.

The impact could be huge. A Times analysis found that about 190,000 parcels in L.A. neighborhoods zoned for single-family homes are located in the “transit rich” areas identified in SB 827. Residences in those neighborhoods could eventually be replaced with buildings ranging from 45 to 85 feet, city officials say.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.