L.A. City Council Unanimously Opposes State Bill Intended to Increase Dense Housing in Transit Corridors

A passenger boards the Metro 217 bus on La Cienega Boulevard in a file photo. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

A passenger boards the Metro 217 bus on La Cienega Boulevard in a file photo. (Credit: Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

The Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to oppose a bill allowing residential buildings of four to eight stories on streets near public transit, despite objections from business leaders and groups that favor higher-density housing.

The 13-0 vote makes L.A. the largest municipality in California to come out against Senate Bill 827, which would loosen or eliminate restrictions on height, density, parking and design for residential projects near bus and rail stops.

Councilman Paul Koretz, who represents much of the Westside, called the bill “pure insanity.” And Councilman David Ryu, who wrote the resolution opposing the bill, said it would result in the widespread displacement of renters, generating “a housing boom for a privileged few and eviction notices for everyone else.”

“Los Angeles has a long and painful history of displacement in the name of progress, and of well-intended bills that uproot communities and destroy neighborhoods,” Ryu said. “SB 827 is one such bill.”

Read the full story on LATimes.com.