Majority of Californians Eligible for Las Vegas Shooting Compensation Fund Haven’t Applied

Six months after a Las Vegas music festival became the scene of the largest mass shooting in modern American history, the vast majority of Californians who were there have not applied for the financial assistance available to cover lost wages, funeral expenses, counseling or other medical bills.

Mourners hold their candles in the air for a moment of silence during a vigil on the Las Vegas Strip to mark one week since the mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, Oct. 8, 2017. (Credit: Drew Angerer / Getty Images)

Mourners hold their candles in the air for a moment of silence during a vigil on the Las Vegas Strip to mark one week since the mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival, Oct. 8, 2017. (Credit: Drew Angerer / Getty Images)

Of the 22,000 concert attendees, about 14,000 were from California, according to the California Victim Compensation Board, a decades-old state agency assisting victims of crime. It is working with its counterpart in Nevada because so many concert attendees were from those two states.

As of last week, the California agency had received about 2,700 applications.

A total of 58 people were killed in the massacre that Stephen Paddock conducted from his room at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. More than 700 were wounded, and thousands are thought to be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Read the full story on LATimes.com