Historic Summit Between North, South Korea Met With Skepticism, Hope in L.A.’s Koreatown

One man stayed up past 5 a.m. to watch history being made. Another awoke at 3 a.m. and turned on the news. Still others perused stacks of newspapers for details of the events 6,000 miles away.

At a McDonald's in Koreatown on April 27, 2018, the historic summit between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un dominated conversations at nearly every table. (Credit: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

At a McDonald's in Koreatown on April 27, 2018, the historic summit between South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un dominated conversations at nearly every table. (Credit: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

In Los Angeles' Koreatown, news of the historic summit between the leaders of North and South Korea was met early Friday with tears, skepticism and, for some, a long-awaited glimmer of hope.

The joint announcement that the two nations will work toward denuclearizing the peninsula, establishing lines of communication and formally ending the Korean War came in the wee hours in Los Angeles, home to the largest community of Koreans in the U.S.

The news was particularly poignant for the dozens of elderly Korean Americans who frequent a McDonald's in the heart of Koreatown, for whom the war isn't a page in the history books but a vivid childhood memory. Friday morning at the fast-food joint, where coffee is cheap and company ample, the summit was at the center of conversations at almost every table.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.