Story Summary

Dodger Stadium Beating of Bryan Stow

stow-and-kids

Bryan Stow and his two children. (Credit: Family photo)

Bryan Stow was critically injured when he was attacked in the Dodger Stadium parking lot after the Dodgers and Giants season opening game on March 31, 2011.

Police said Stow was targeted by Dodgers fans as he walked through the parking lot at the stadium because he was wearing a Giants jersey.

Story Timeline
Previous Next
This story has 8 updates

One of the two men who pleaded guilty to the brutal beating of Giants fan Bryan Stow was taken into custody Friday on a federal weapons charge.

marvin-norwood

Defendant Marvin Norwood and his attorney Victor Escobedo during Norwood’s preliminary hearing in Los Angeles Superior court May 31, 2012. (Credit: Getty Images)

The charges stem from Marvin Norwood’s 2011 arrest in connection with Stow’s beating. During the arrest, authorities found several firearms and live ammunition where Norwood, 33, was living, according to a federal criminal complaint.

He pleaded guilty in county court Thursday to assaulting Stow, bringing an end to a case that has drawn national attention.

The weapons were recovered from an attic crawl space at Norwood’s residence in Rialto, according to the complaint.

During an interview with detectives, Norwood stated that the guns were not his, but that he knew they were there.

“I know there’s a couple of rifles and a couple of handguns,” Norwood told detectives.

Norwood was facing federal charges in the case because he was already a convicted felon at the time of the arrest.

Norwood could be sentenced to 10 years in prison if convicted on the charges.

After his guilty plea Thursday to one count of assault, Norwood was sentenced to four years in prison.

A county prosecutor initially said that Norwood would be immediately released because of time served. However, because of Norwood’s weapon charge, he was turned over to federal authorities.

Louie Sanchez, 31, who was also charged in Stow’s beating, pleaded guilty Thursday as well. Sanchez was sentenced to eight years in prison.

Stow was critically injured when he was attacked in the Dodger Stadium parking lot after the Dodgers and Giants season opening game on March 31, 2011.

Police said Stow was targeted because he was wearing a Giants jersey.

Two men accused in the 2011 brutal beating of a San Francisco Giants fan outside of Dodger Stadium were due back in court Thursday morning. Lynette Romero reports from downtown Los Angeles for the KTLA 5 Morning News on Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014.

Before a court hearing Thursday in which two defendants pleaded guilty in the 2011 beating of Giants fan Bryan Stow at Dodger Stadium, statements were read from four family members.

stow

A family photo show Bryan Stow with his two children.

Marvin Norwood, 33, and Louie Sanchez, 31, were sentenced to four and eight years in prison, respectively.

RELATED: 2 Plead Guilty in Dodger Stadium Beating of Bryan Stow

David Stow, Bryan’s father

… The significance now is not that whether you are Dodger fans and Bryan was a Giants fan. The sport of baseball pales to this action.

The attack that you inflicted on my son on March 31, 2011, at Dodger Stadium was so mean and vicious that it has left Bryan unable to care for himself. Bryan has a lifetime of pain, therapy, hard work daily that he must endure. He will strive to persevere. …

david-stow

David Stow reads a statement on his son’s beating in court on Feb. 20, 2014. (Credit: pool)

What you both did, late in the evening in the dark at Dodger Stadium, was cowardly. We hold no hate against you; we despise you.

The time you serve is insignificant compared to what Bryan must endure. However, the years you spend in prison is what you cretins deserve.

Bonnie Stow, Bryan’s sister

… We shower him, we dress him, we fix his meals and we make sure he gets his 13 medications throughout the day. … You get to live your life as you choose. Bryan did not choose this. No sentencing you receive will ever be long enough. Eventually you will be released. Bryan’s sentence is a lifetime.

bonnie-stow

Bonnie Stow reads her statement. (Credit: pool)

You showed no conscience when you didn’t come forward. You showed no remorse by dragging this out. Your lack of regret makes me despise you even more.

I envy those people who can forgive others who commit crimes against their loved ones. I am here to say I am not one of those people.

Jacqueline Kain, Bryan’s ex-wife (statement read by Erin Collins, Bryan’s sister)

Our son Tyler’s first word was ‘ball.’ His next word was ‘daddy.’ When they started playing catch, Bryan promised to play catch with him every day. And he did, until both of you took that away from him.

Our daughter Tabitha loved to ride bikes with her daddy, and he did that every day. Again, until both of you took that away from him.

Based on your actions, it is completely obvious that you have no respect for human life. …

It’s been extremely hard for me to try to explain to my children why this happened to their dad. What would you say to a child who doesn’t understand the hatred you portrayed? … My children had to learn early on that there are horrible, mean people that exist.

(discusses him being a paramedic) He was the type that would stop and try to save you….

You took my kid’s daddy away from them. Do you have any remorse?… Every morning you get to wake up and get out of bed and live, even if it is behind bars. You are able to live, and Bryan can’t even get up out of bed. He can’t do anything without assistance because of you.

I asked my children if they wanted to say or write anything to either of you, and they simply put their heads down and said no.

They still cry about how their dad is now, as do I. We will all miss the Bryan that you both took from us, again, for no reason whatsoever.

I teach my children that life is all about choices. … You made a choice to purposefully and permanently disable a man, in my mind, with the intent to kill. Now you must live with that on your minds, behind bars.

erin-collins

Erin Collins, Bryan Stow’s sister, delivered her statement and that of Stow’s ex-wife. (Credit: pool)

Erin Collins, Bryan’s sister

… To say you got off easy in an understatement. … Because of your actions, Bryan can’t go to the bathroom by himself. He can’t shower by himself. He has to wear adult diapers, and I hate having to even say that out loud, but it shows the severity of what you did.

As men, are you proud of yourselves? And as fathers, are you proud of yourselves?

Being here, I’d hoped to see one tiny bit of remorse, in order to not think you both are that despicable. But I don’t. How can we even begin to consider forgiveness when you aren’t even asking for it?

I’m still not sure I believe in karma, but if there is such a thing, then I imagine prison life won’t be pleasant.

I included on here (gesturing to written papers) that that gives me some relief, but it doesn’t. Because I feel sad, I feel sad for us, and I feel sad for your families. And I hope you understand what you did.

The two men accused in the 2011 brutal beating of a San Francisco Giants fan outside of Dodger Stadium pleaded guilty to charges in the case Thursday morning.

norwood sanchez

Marvin Norwood, left, and Louie Sanchez appear in court after submitting their guilty pleas Feb. 20, 2014, in the 2011 beating of Bryan Stow. (Credit: pool)

Marvin Norwood, 33, and Louie Sanchez, 31, were charged with mayhem, assault and battery in connection with the attack on 45-year-old Bryan Stow, according to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office.

Sanchez pleaded guilty to one count of mayhem, while Norwood pleaded guilty to one count of assault, the DA’s office announced in a news release.

Following the guilty plea, family members of Stow — including his father and two sisters — addressed the court and the defendants.

“What you both did late in the evening at Dodger Stadium was cowardly,” Stow’s father David, who spoke first, said. “The time you serve is insignificant compared to what Bryan must endure.”

Bryan Stow, a father of two, suffered brain damage and permanent disability in the attack.

David Stowe added that his son has a lifetime of pain, therapy and hard work that he would be forced to endure on a daily basis.

His younger sister, Bonnie, spoke next. She got emotional as she talked about having to take care of Bryan.

“My family – my sister and my parents – we shower him, we dress him, we fix his meals, and we make sure he gets his 13 medications throughout the day,” she said. “You get to live your life as you choose. Bryan did not choose this. No sentencing you receive will ever be long enough.”

Erin Collins, his other sister, addressed the two men last.

“I feel sad. I feel sad for us, I feel sad for your families. And I hope you understand what you did,” she said, appearing to fight back tears.

“To say you got off easy is an understatement,” Collins added.

RELATED: Emotional Court Statements Convey Depth of Impact of Bryan Stow’s Beating

Collins also delivered a written statement on behalf of Stow’s ex-wife.

“We live in a completely different world than you, but my children had to learn early on that horrible, mean people exist,” she wrote.

Finally, L.A. Superior Court Judge George G. Lomeli, who presided over the case, addressed the two men.

Noting that the case “screams out that comment be made,” he said he felt compelled to speak and delivered harsh criticism to both men.

“You not only ruined the life of Mr. Stow, the obvious victim in this matter, but of his children, his spouse, his family, his friends,” Lomeli said. “From what I know of Mr. Stow, he’s an individual who was very decent. That is shown by the line of work he did, and that was a paramedic. He was only trying to help people.”

“You are the biggest nightmare for individuals that attend public events, such as sporting events or concerts. My son and I have season tickets to college football and my biggest fear, which is probably true for most of the people that appear there … is that we run into people like you,” he added.

At one point Sanchez smiled during the judge’s scolding, which further drew his ire.

“Oh you’re smiling?” the judge said. “It’s funny?”

“It’s not funny,” Sanchez responded.

“It was only a game,” Lomeli said. “You lost perspective, and that’s unfortunate.”

The two initially pleaded not guilty to charges related to the March 31, 2011, beating.

Police said Stow was targeted by Dodgers fans as he walked through the parking lot at the stadium on opening day game because he was wearing a Giants jersey.

Sanchez knocked Stow unconscious during an unprovoked attacked, the DA’s office stated in the release.

According to witnesses, Norwood prevented Stow’s friends from helping him, the DA’s office said.

As part of the plea deal, Lomeli sentenced Norwood to four years in prison and Sanchez to eight years.

A county prosecutor initially said that Norwood would be immediately released because of time served.

However, because both men were charged in 2012 for being felons in possession of a handgun, Norwood will be turned over to federal authorities, according to Thom Mrozek, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Central District of California.

Mrozek added that could happen as early as Friday.

Hours after Norwood and Sanchez pleaded guilty, the L.A. Dodgers released a statement.

“We are pleased that the culpable parties have finally accepted responsibility for their actions and have been sentenced for their crimes,” the emailed statement read.

The organization declined to comment further because of “pending civil action.”

Two men charged with severely beating San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow at Dodger Stadium on Opening Day 2011 are due back in court Thursday, and several law enforcement sources said guilty pleas are possible.

stow-and-kidsMarvin Norwood, 30, and Louie Sanchez, 31, face charges of mayhem, assault and battery, and inflicting great bodily injury in the beating of Stow, a 44-year-old father of two.

The March 31 attack left Stow, a Northern California paramedic, with serious head trauma and a permanent disability that means he will need care for the rest of his life.

The incident drew national attention and calls for police, city officials and the Dodgers to tighten stadium security and better protect fans. Stow was attacked as he and three other Giants fans, all Bay Area paramedics, walked through the parking lot after the Dodger win. Witnesses at a preliminary hearing last year described boorish, drunken and profane behavior directed against Giants fans by Sanchez.

Click here to read the full story at LATimes.com.

stow-and-kidsSAN FRANCISCO — Bryan Stow, the father of 2 who was viciously beaten in the parking lot of Dodger Stadium, has suffered a setback.

Stow is hospitalized again because of a “large blood clot.”

On their website, family members say the clot is from Stow’s thigh to his pelvis.

He was initially hospitalized earlier this week and then released, only to be rushed back again 2 days ago.

“Needless to say, we are scared and worried. We thought we were past the point of being afraid of Bryan even surviving,” the website entry read.

Stow is expected to be in the hospital at least through the weekend.

Stow suffered permanent brain damage in the 2011 attack.

Louie Sanchez, 29, and Marvin Norwood, 30, pleaded not guilty to the beating in November.

LOS ANGELES, Calif. (KTLA) — A lawsuit filed by a man arrested, then cleared, in the brutal beating of Giants fan Bryan Stow has been dismissed.

Giovanni Ramirez filed the defamation suit against the LAPD and Chief Charlie Beck in July.

According to court documents, Ramirez alleges Beck convicted him in the public eye without any forensic evidence.

Beck called Ramirez the “primargiovanni-stowy aggressor” and a “thug,” according to court documents filed Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court.

“Beck knew … that each and every statement was false or that he was acting with reckless disregard for the truth,” court documents state.

But on Monday, U.S. District Judge Gary Feess dismissed the case.

Feess dismissed the case based on the fact Ramirez was never criminally charged and therefore suffered no violation of due process.

Feess also ruled that Ramirez’s 4th Amendment rights were not violated when his residence was searched because he was on parole and subject to search conditions.

Stow, a paramedic and father of 2 was beaten into a coma in a Dodger Stadium parking lot on opening day last summer and was hospitalized for months.

He continues to recover in Northern California.

Two other men, Louie Sanchez and Marvin Norwood, were later arrested and charged in connection with the Stow beating.

LOS ANGELES (KTLA) — San Francisco General Hospital is suing the Los Angeles Dodgers and former owner Frank McCourt for medical costs related to the beating of Giants fan Bryan Stow.

The San Francisco Examiner reports the hospital is asking for $1.2 million to cover the cost of providing Stow’s extensive brain trauma care.

The beating happened in the parking lot of Dodger Stadium in March of last year following the Dodgers’ home opener versus the Giants.

It left Stow, a paramedic and father of two from Santa Cruz, with permanent brain damage.

The two men accused in Stow’s beating appeared in court on Tuesday morning for brief a pre-trial hearing.

The next hearing date for Louie Sanchez and Marvin Norwood was set for Feb. 21.

Both suspects are charged with three felony counts: for mayhem, assault by means likely to produce great bodily injury, and battery with serious bodily injury.

Sanchez also faces allegations that he inflicted great bodily injury on Stow in the assault and battery counts.

He has also been charged with two additional misdemeanor counts — one for battery related to a run-in with a female Giants fan and one for assault on a young man at whom he allegedly swung a fist.

Both Sanchez and Norwood have pleaded not guilty to the charges against them.

Earlier this year, a judge ruled there was enough evidence for the men to stand trial after a six-day preliminary hearing that included some dramatic testimony.

On the first day of the hearing, prosecutors showed a video of Norwood sitting in an interrogation room, speaking to his mother on an LAPD detective’s cellphone.

“Hey, I got arrested for that Dodger Stadium thing,” the Norwood says. “I was involved …. To a certain extent I was.”

He tells his mother he can’t say much over the phone but says Sanchez is also in custody.

Norwood then apologizes: “Pretty sure I’m going down for it …. I’m sorry.”

The hearing also included testimony from Corey Maciel, Stow’s friend and a fellow paramedic who was at the game.

He said that Stow was attacked after he used medical slang to express his disgust with a group of Dodgers fans who were taunting them.

Maciel said Stow made the comment after their group had endured hours of heckling and thrown food inside the stadium.

He quoted Stow as saying “I hope they code” — shorthand for suffering cardiac arrest.

Advertisement