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Small Plane Crashes into Hangar at Santa Monica Airport

A small twin-engine plane crashed after landing at Santa Monica Airport on Sunday, authorities said.

The Cessna Citation, which had departed from Hailey, Idaho, went off the right side of a runway and struck a hangar at 6:20 p.m., according to Ian Gregor, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman. The hangar then collapsed.

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The cause of last month’s deadly plane crash at Santa Monica Airport is still unknown, but federal investigators on Thursday released their preliminary findings on the incident, debunking some early theories about why the crash occurred.

santa monica crash smoke

Four people died in a Sept. 29 crash at Santa Monica Airport that NTSB officials were continuing to investigate.

The dramatic Sept. 29 crash left dark smoke billowing into the air and the four Southern Californians aboard the 2003 Cessna 525A Citation dead.

The tires of the small twin-engine plane — which veered off the runway during its landing and crashed into a hangar — “showed no signs of unusual wear,” the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report Thursday.

No debris was on the runway at the time of the crash, officials also determined.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, “the pilot did not express over the radio any problems prior to or during the landing,” NTSB confirmed in their findings.

The evening crash occurred after a flight from Hailey, Idaho.

All four of the plane’s passengers – Mark Benjamin, 63, his son Lucas Benjamin, 28, his son’s girlfriend, Lauren Winkler, 28, and Kyla Dupont, 53 — died.

Three of the bodies removed from a plane that crashed Sunday at Santa Monica Airport were identified by authorities Friday.

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Mark Benjamin, Kyla Dupont and Lauren Winkler are three of the four people killed in a fiery plane crash at Santa Monica Airport. (credit: DMV)

Lauren Winkler, 28, of Irvine, was identified Friday morning as one of four people who were killed in the crash, according to Kristy McCracken of the Los Angeles County Coroners Office.

Kyla Dupont, 53, of San Diego, and Mark Benjamin, 63, of Malibu were identified by coroner’s officials later in the day.

The fourth victim has not been officially identified, but a Southland construction company on Monday issued a statement indicating that Benjamin’s adult son may have been on the plane.

“We are aware of a plane crash at Santa Monica Airports last night. While we do not have specific facts, we believe that our President and CEO, Mark Benjamin, and his son, Luke Benjamin, a Senior Project Engineer with us were on board,” read the statement issued by Charles Muttillo, vice president of Morley Construction.

Benjamin’s son, Luke, was 28.

The Cessna Citation, which had departed from Hailey, Idaho, went off the right side of a runway and struck a hangar at 6:20 p.m. Sunday, according to Ian Gregor, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman. The hangar then collapsed.

Santa Monica firefighters responded to the crash site and extinguished a fire that sent plumes of black smoke into the air.

Fire personnel not immediately able to access the wreckage due to the collapse of the hangar, authorities said.

NTSB investigators arrived shortly after the crash, but said the building was too unstable to enter.

Two cats and a dog were also aboard the jet.

Four bodies were removed Tuesday from a plane that crashed Sunday at Santa Monica Airport, according to the Los Angeles County coroner’s office. The victims were two women and two men. Two cats and a dog were also aboard the jet. No positive identifications had been made.

Steve Kuzj reports from Santa Monica for the KTLA News at 10 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 1, 2013.

Four bodies were removed Tuesday morning from a plane that crashed Sunday at Santa Monica Airport, according to the Los Angeles County coroner’s office.

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Santa Monica firefighters monitor the collapsed aircraft hangar where a private jet crashed and burned Sunday evening at Santa Monica Airport. (Credit: Dan Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)

The victims were two women and two men, CNN reported, but were not identified. Two cats and a dog were also aboard the jet.

A Southland construction company on Monday issued a statement indicating that its CEO and his adult son may have been on the plane.

“We are aware of a plane crash at Santa Monica Airports last night. While we do not have specific facts, we believe that our President and CEO, Mark Benjamin, and his son, Luke Benjamin, a Senior Project Engineer with us were on board,” read the statement issued by Charles Muttillo, vice president of Morley Construction.

Mark Benjamin was 63. His son, Luke, was 28.

It was not immediately known if additional bodies were still in the wreckage of the plane, which reportedly seated eight.

The Cessna Citation, which had departed from Hailey, Idaho, went off the right side of a runway and struck a hangar at 6:20 p.m. Sunday, according to Ian Gregor, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman. The hangar then collapsed.

Santa Monica firefighters responded to the crash site and extinguished a fire that sent plumes of black smoke into the air.

Fire personnel not immediately able to access the wreckage due to the collapse of the hangar, authorities said.

NTSB investigators arrived shortly after the crash, but said the building was too unstable to enter.

New Details in Deadly Plane Crash in Santa Monica

The CEO of one of the largest construction firms in the Southland and his adult son were believed to be on board the small plane that veered off a runway crashed into a hangar after landing Sunday night at Santa Monica Airport, the company said in a statement.

hangar-santa-monica-airport

Santa Monica firefighters monitor the collapsed aircraft hangar where a private jet crashed and burned Sunday evening at Santa Monica Airport. (Credit: Dan Bartletti / Los Angeles Times)

“We are aware of a plane crash at Santa Monica Airports last night. While we do not have specific facts, we believe that our President and CEO, Mark Benjamin, and his son, Luke Benjamin, a Senior Project Engineer with us were on board,” read a statement issued Monday by Charles Muttillo, vice president of Morley Construction.

Mark Benjamin was 63. His son, Luke, was 28.

National Transportation Safety Board were expected to hold a news conference Monday afternoon after sifting through the wreckage of the fiery plane crash, authorities said. No bodies had been removed from the site as of Monday morning.

The Cessna Citation, which had departed from Hailey, Idaho, went off the right side of a runway and struck a hangar at 6:20 p.m. Sunday, according to Ian Gregor, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman.

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Firefighters work to extinguish a fire Sunday at Santa Monica Airport, where a small plane struck a hangar after landing. (Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

The hangar then collapsed.  NTSB investigators arrived shortly after the crash, but said the building was too unstable to enter.

Santa Monica firefighters could be seen battling the flames in the 3000 block of Donald Douglas Loop.

But they were not immediately able to access the wreckage due to the collapse of the hangar, authorities said.

“It was an unsurvivable crash,” said Capt. John Nevandro of the Santa Monica Fire Department.

Santa Monica Fire Department officials said they planned to use a large crane to lift the hangar off the aircraft on Monday, according to Gregor.

It was not known how many people were on the plane.

A small twin-engine plane crashed after landing at Santa Monica Airport on Sunday, authorities said.

santa monica crash smoke

Plumes of smoke rise are seen at Santa Monica Airport after a plane crash on Sunday. (Credit: Valerie Vanderwest)

The Cessna Citation, which had departed from Hailey, Idaho, went off the right side of a runway and struck a hangar at 6:20 p.m., according to Ian Gregor, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman. The hangar then collapsed.

Santa Monica firefighters and police responded to the scene in the 3000 block of Donald Douglas Loop.

“It was an unsurvivable crash,” said Capt. John Nevandro of the Santa Monica Fire Department.

Firefighters were not immediately able to access the wreckage due to the collapse of the hangar, authorities said.

Santa Monica Fire Department officials said a large crane will be required to lift the hangar off the aircraft, according to Gregor. Firefighters do not expect to be able to reach the plane until sometime Monday.

It was not known how many people were on the plane, or whether anyone on the ground was struck.

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