Story Summary

Black HIV/AIDS Awareness

As Black History Month comes to a close, Gayle Anderson was live with AIDS Project Los Angeles to remind everyone February 7th was National Black HIV/AIDS AWARENESS DAY (NBHAAD), a national HIV/AIDS testing and treatment community mobilization effort designed to encourage Blacks across the United States and the diaspora to get educated, get tested, get treated, and get involved in raising awareness about HIV/AIDS in the Black community. Nationwide, more than 3,500 organizations in more than 600 cities will participate in the thirteenth annual observance of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, which is coordinated by Healthy Black Communities.
African-Americans are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS than other ethnic and racial groups. African-Americans are only 14% of the U.S. population, but account for 44% of new HIV infections. Even more startling is the fact that 1 in 16 Black men and 1 in 32 Black women will be diagnosed with HIV infection in their lifetimes. The number of new HIV infections per year among Blacks is down from its peak in the late 1980s, but has exceeded the rates of infection among Whites since that time. Although the numbers for new infections have remained stable in recent years, 33% of Blacks were tested for HIV late in their illness and subsequently diagnosed with AIDS within one year of testing positive for HIV.  
According to the CDC, in 2009, an estimated 16,741 Blacks were diagnosed with AIDS in the United States, a number that has slowly decreased since 2006. By the end of 2008, an estimated 240,627 Blacks with AIDS diagnosis had died in the U.S.
These statistics emphasize the need for early testing and education on how to prevent HIV/AIDS in the Black community. Healthy Black Communities encourages individuals to get educated, get tested, get treated and get involved.

GET EDUCATED:
HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) is a virus that infects human beings and weakens your immune system by destroying important cells (T-cells or CD4 cells) that fight disease and infection. When HIV has destroyed so many of your CD4 cells that your body can’t fight infections and diseases anymore, the HIV infection can lead to AIDS.
AIDS (Acquired Immunodeciency Syndrome) is the final stage of HIV infection. It is not a single disease, but a complex illness with a wide range of complications and symptoms. People at this stage of HIV disease have badly damaged immune systems, which put them at risk for opportunistic infections.
HIV lives and reproduces in blood and other body fluids, such as blood, semen, pre-seminal fluid, breast milk, vaginal fluids, and rectal mucous.
HIV is transmitted through these body fluids in very specific ways: during sexual contact (anal, oral, or vaginal sex); during pregnancy, childbirth or breastfeeding; as a result of injection drug use; as a result of occupational exposure (primarily amongst healthcare workers); and as a result of blood transfusions with infected blood or from an infected donor.
Because of “highly active” combinations of medications introduced since the mid-1990s, people with HIV can live much longer – even decades- before they develop AIDS.

GET TESTED:  AIDS Project Los Angeles offers free and confidential rapid HIV testing for all! Getting tested regularly for HIV is one of the best ways to stay healthy and safe. One in five people who are living with HIV don’t know it, and most HIV infections are transmitted by people who do not know their status. Know you results in about one hour. No appointment is necessary. For more information about AIDS Project Los Angeles, please visit their website or call (213) 201-1600. There are many locations across Los Angeles County that provide HIV testing. For additional testing locations, please click HERE.

GET TREATED:  There are several organizations throughout Los Angeles County that provide treatment and support services for people living with HIV, including AIDS Project Los Angeles.

GET INVOLVED: There are many way that you can get involved in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Please contact AIDS Project Los Angeles for more information or to make a donation.

AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA), one of the largest non-profit AIDS service organizations in the United States, provides bilingual direct services, prevention education and leadership on HIV/AIDS-related policy and legislation. With more than 30 years of service, APLA is a community-based, volunteer-supported organization with local, national and global reach. For more information, locations, or to make a donation visit the APLA website.

Healthy Black Communities, Inc. is an international community-based organization focused on health education and disease prevention in Black communities. It serves as the lead organization for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, working with local, regional and national partners to direct, plan and strategically oversee the events/activities held each year. As the lead organization, Healthy Black Communities is responsible for managing communications, materials development and dissemination, as well as brand maintenance. For more information, visit their website.

If you have questions, please feel free to call Gayle Anderson at 323-460-5732 or e-mail Gayle at Gayle.Anderson@KTLA.com

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As Black History Month comes to a close, Gayle Anderson was live with AIDS Project Los Angeles to remind everyone February 7th was National Black HIV/AIDS AWARENESS DAY (NBHAAD), a national HIV/AIDS testing and treatment community mobilization effort designed to encourage Blacks across the United States and the diaspora to get educated, get tested, get treated, and get involved in raising awareness about HIV/AIDS in the Black community. Gayle talked with Janelle L’Heureux about nutrition needs for those living with HIV/AIDS.

AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA), one of the largest non-profit AIDS service organizations in the United States, provides bilingual direct services, prevention education and leadership on HIV/AIDS-related policy and legislation. With more than 30 years of service, APLA is a community-based, volunteer-supported organization with local, national and global reach. For more information, locations, or information on donating visit the APLA website here.

To learn more about “Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day” you can visit their website.

If you have questions, please feel free to call Gayle Anderson at 323-460-5732 or e-mail Gayle at Gayle.Anderson@KTLA.com

As Black History Month comes to a close, Gayle Anderson was live with AIDS Project Los Angeles to remind everyone February 7th was National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD), a national HIV/AIDS testing and treatment community mobilization effort designed to encourage Blacks across the United States and the diaspora to get educated, get tested, get treated, and get involved in raising awareness about HIV/AIDS in the Black community. Gayle talked with Gabriel McGowan from APLA Los Angeles and with Nolan Butler, a patient of Dr. Steven Vitero, about his positive experience with dental care.

AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA), one of the largest non-profit AIDS service organizations in the United States, provides bilingual direct services, prevention education and leadership on HIV/AIDS-related policy and legislation. With more than 30 years of service, APLA is a community-based, volunteer-supported organization with local, national and global reach. For more information, locations, or information on donating visit the APLA website here

To learn more about “Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day” you can visit their website.

If you have questions, please feel free to call Gayle Anderson at 323-460-5732 or e-mail Gayle at Gayle.Anderson@KTLA.com

As Black History Month comes to a close, Gayle Anderson was live with AIDS Project Los Angeles to remind everyone February 7th was National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD), a national HIV/AIDS testing and treatment community mobilization effort designed to encourage Blacks across the United States and the diaspora to get educated, get tested, get treated, and get involved in raising awareness about HIV/AIDS in the Black community. Gayle talked with Dr. Steven Vitero, a dentist involved in the project, who is providing dental care for HIV positive patients.

AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA), one of the largest non-profit AIDS service organizations in the United States, provides bilingual direct services, prevention education and leadership on HIV/AIDS-related policy and legislation. With more than 30 years of service, APLA is a community-based, volunteer-supported organization with local, national and global reach. For more information, locations, or information on donating visit the APLA website here

To learn more about “Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day” you can visit their website.

If you have questions, please feel free to call Gayle Anderson at 323-460-5732 or e-mail Gayle at Gayle.Anderson@KTLA.com

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