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Hillary Clinton Hospitalized for Blood Clot

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was hospitalized after doctors discovered a blood clot during a follow-up exam related to a concussion she suffered after fainting.

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hillary-helmetWASHINGTON (CNN) — U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton returned to work Monday morning for the first time since she was sidelined by illness, a concussion and a blood clot.

At a meeting with assistant secretaries of state, she was greeted by colleagues showing off their sense of humor.

Deputy Secretary of State Thomas Nides handed Clinton a box, saying, “As you know, Washington is a contact sport.”

“Inside was a football helmet with a State Department seal, lots of good padding and also a football jersey that said Clinton on the back and on the front it says #112 which symbolizes the number of countries she visited as secretary of state,” spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said.

“She loved it. She thought it was cool. But then being Hillary Clinton she wanted to get right to business.”

The secretary was discharged from a New York hospital Wednesday, three days after she was admitted for the treatment of a blood clot in a vein between her skull and brain.

Doctors found the clot during a medical test related to a concussion she suffered in December, which she sustained after fainting from dehydration caused by the flu.

Clinton was treated with blood thinners to dissolve the clot, which did not cause a stroke or any neurological damage.

On Friday, department Nuland described Clinton’s condition after her release as “upbeat” and “raring to go” and said Clinton was planning to return to work at the State Department this week.

Nuland was asked earlier in the week how Clinton’s illness might affect her plans to testify on Capitol Hill about the deadly September terror attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Nuland did not directly say whether Clinton would appear.

“She has said that she is open to going up to the Hill. We are working with them now on their schedule because there’s also a question of when they are going to be in, and we will let you know when we have something to share,” Nuland said.

Clinton, a former first lady, New York senator and presidential candidate, does not plan to stay on for President Barack Obama’s second term but prefers to remain until her replacement is in place.

Some senators have said they would delay confirmation hearings for her proposed successor, Sen. John Kerry, until Clinton has testified on the Libya attack that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.

The House and Senate have both adjourned until mid-January, and no Congressional hearings were listed on the State Department schedule released Sunday.

NEW YORK — Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was released from the hospital Wednesday after being for a blood clot in her head.

Her doctors say she is making good progress and is expected to make a full recovery.

Clinton had been in the hospital since Sunday, when doctors discovered the clot during a follow-up exam stemming from a concussion she suffered earlier in December.

While at home battling a stomach virus, Clinton had fainted, fallen and struck her head, a spokesman said.

Blood clots “are clumps that occur when blood hardens from a liquid to a solid,” according to the National Institutes for Health.

Clots can form inside veins or arteries or even the heart, the NIH says. “A blockage in the vein will usually cause fluid buildup and swelling,” the NIH website says. Among the possible threats: Sometimes, a “clot can break loose and travel from one location in the body to another.”

Sometimes, it can “partly or completely block” blood flow in a blood vessel. If a clot blocks an artery, it may “prevent oxygen from reaching the tissues in that area,” the NIH says.

If not “treated promptly, it can lead to tissue damage or death.”

Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN chief medical correspondent, says the fact that Clinton’s clot is being treated with anticoagulants may offer a clue to the clot’s location.

Anticoagulants are drugs that prevent clots from forming in the heart veins and arteries, according to the American Heart Association. Anticoagulants also prevent clots from growing larger.

“I think it’s very unlikely this is a blood clot on top of the brain or around the brain specifically, because you just don’t treat blood clots on the brain that way,” Gupta said. “That would worsen the bleeding.”

Clinton spent the holidays with her family last week after working from home.

She was scheduled to return to work at the State Department this week after being sidelined for the past three weeks.Her illness forced her to bow out of testifying on December 20 before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on the deadly attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Deputies Thomas Nides and Bill Burns appeared in her place.

The medical setback comes as Clinton is wrapping up her busy tenure as secretary of state, during which she has logged more than 400 travel days and nearly a million miles. She plans to step down from the post if and when Sen. John Kerry — President Barack Obama’s choice to replace her — is confirmed by the Senate.

Clinton To Testify On Benghazi AttackNEW YORK (CNN) — Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was treated with blood thinners on Monday at a New York hospital to help dissolve a blood clot in her head and doctors were confident she would make a full recovery.

Clinton was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital on Sunday due to the clot that was discovered during a follow-up exam related to a concussion she suffered this month, her spokesman, Philippe Reines, said.

The clot was located in the vein between the brain and and the skull behind Clinton’s right ear and did not result in any stroke or neurological damage, her doctors said in a statement.

Clinton was treated with blood thinners to help dissolve the clot and would be released once the medication dose had been established, they said.

“In all other aspects of her recovery, the secretary is making excellent progress and we are confident she will make a full recovery. She is in good spirits, engaging with her doctors, her family, and her staff,” Clinton’s doctors said.

Clinton, 65, was suffering from a stomach virus earlier this month when she fainted because of dehydration, causing the concussion.

Blood clots “are clumps that occur when blood hardens from a liquid to a solid,” according to the National Institutes for Health.

Clots can form inside veins or arteries or even the heart, the NIH says. “A blockage in the vein will usually cause fluid buildup and swelling,” the NIH website says.

Among the possible threats: Sometimes, a “clot can break loose and travel from one location in the body to another.”

Clinton spent the holidays with her family last week after working from home.

She was scheduled to return to work at the State Department this week after being sidelined for most of the past month.

Her illness forced her to bow out of testifying on December 20 before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya.

Clinton, a one-time presidential candidate who is the source of constant speculation she might run again in 2016, plans to step down from the State Department once a replacement is confirmed by the Senate.

NEW YORK (CNN) — Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was treated with blood thinners on Monday at a New York hospital to help dissolve a blood clot in her head and doctors were confident she would make a full recovery.

Clinton was admitted to New York Presbyterian Hospital on Sunday due to the clot that was discovered during a follow-up exam related to a concussion she suffered this month, her spokesman, Philippe Reines, said.

The clot was located in the vein between the brain and and the skull behind Clinton’s right ear and did not result in any stroke or neurological damage, her doctors said in a statement.

Clinton was treated with blood thinners to help dissolve the clot and would be released once the medication dose had been established, they said.

“In all other aspects of her recovery, the secretary is making excellent progress and we are confident she will make a full recovery. She is in good spirits, engaging with her doctors, her family, and her staff,” Clinton’s doctors said.

Clinton, 65, was suffering from a stomach virus earlier this month when she fainted because of dehydration, causing the concussion.

Blood clots “are clumps that occur when blood hardens from a liquid to a solid,” according to the National Institutes for Health.

Clots can form inside veins or arteries or even the heart, the NIH says. “A blockage in the vein will usually cause fluid buildup and swelling,” the NIH website says. Among the possible threats: Sometimes, a “clot can break loose and travel from one location in the body to another.”

Clinton spent the holidays with her family last week after working from home.

She was scheduled to return to work at the State Department this week after being sidelined for most of the past month.

Her illness forced her to bow out of testifying on December 20 before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on the deadly September attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya.

Clinton, a one-time presidential candidate who is the source of constant speculation she might run again in 2016, plans to step down from the State Department once a replacement is confirmed by the Senate.

Washington — U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sustained a concussion after becoming dehydrated and fainting, and will no longer testify Thursday before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on the deadly attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Clinton had been suffering from a stomach virus at the time, according to a statement on Saturday from Philippe Reines, deputy assistant secretary of state.

She is being monitored by doctors and is recovering at home. She was never hospitalized, Reines said.

“At their recommendation, she will continue to work from home next week, staying in regular contact with Department and other officials. She is looking forward to being back in the office soon,” Reines said.

Secretary Clinton had been scheduled to testify on Capitol Hill Thursday about the deadly attack in Benghazi, Libya, in September that killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador.

Jodi Seth, spokeswoman for Sen. John Kerry, Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman, said in a statement that Clinton would not testify before that committee Thursday.

“Secretary Clinton’s team contacted Senator Kerry this morning to inform them of the Secretary’s concussion. Senator Kerry was relieved to hear that the Secretary is on the mend, but he insisted that given her condition, she could not and should not appear on Thursday as previously planned, and that the nation’s best interests are served by the report and hearings proceeding as scheduled with senior officials appearing in her place,” Seth said.

The September 11, 2012, attack resulted in the deaths of four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, and called into question the security of U.S. diplomatic personnel abroad.

CNN

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