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Trayvon Martin Shooting

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A six-woman jury in Sanford, Florida, found George Zimmerman not guilty in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

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FORNEY, TX — George Zimmerman — who was acquitted earlier this month on murder charges tied to Trayvon Martin’s death — was stopped this weekend for speeding in northern Texas, according to police.

Zimmerman was apparently traveling with a gun when he was pulled over. Dashcam video released by Forney, Texas, police shows him and a police officer talking briefly before the officer tells him to shut his glove compartment

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George Zimmerman was pulled over for speeding in northern Texas and issued a warning.

“Don’t play with your firearm, OK?” the officer says.

The Forney police officer ultimately sends Zimmerman off with a verbal warning to “slow down.”

Click here to read the full story on CNN.com.

Trayvon Martin’s father, Tracy, said Thursday it was difficult to listen to testimony about his son, particularly the negative comments, during George Zimmerman’s trial.

“That wasn’t the Trayvon that we raised. That wasn’t the Trayvon that we knew, and that we love,” he told CNN’s Anderson Cooper on Thursday night.

Trayvon Martin’s mother, Sybrina Fulton, said that she felt the need to sit through every day of Zimmerman’s trial because her son was “not here to say anything for himself.”

She said that she needed to “show a face” for her son.

Martin’s parents spoke out Thursday for the first time since Zimmerman was acquitted in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

A day after one juror in the George Zimmerman murder trial spoke out on national television, four other members of the six-woman jury released a statement separating themselves from her comments.

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George Zimmerman during his trial in Sanford, Fla. (Joe Burbank / Pool Photo / June 24, 2013)

In their statement to CNN on Tuesday night, the jurors defended their roles in the trial.

“We, the undersigned jurors, understand there is a great deal of interest in this case. But we ask you to remember that we are not public officials and we did not invite this type of attention into our lives,” the jurors wrote.

“We also wish to point out that the opinions of Juror B37, expressed on the Anderson Cooper show, were her own, and not in any way representative of the jurors listed below.”

Click here to read the full story on LATimes.com.

Zimmerman Verdict Protests Continue Tuesday Night

Hundreds of peaceful protesters marched through downtown Los Angeles Tuesday night.
The march began at City Hall and moved on to LAPD headquarters where protesters took up positions on the steps of the building surrounded by officers in riot gear.
Read more: http://ktla.com/2013/07/16/zimmerman-verdict-protesters-remain-peaceful/#ixzz2ZHDXieJN

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The woman, identified just as Juror B37, spoke exclusively to CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360″ on Monday night.

One of the jurors who acquitted George Zimmerman said she had “no doubt” he feared for his life in the final moments of his struggle with Trayvon Martin, and that was the definitive factor in the verdict.

The woman, who was identified just as Juror B37, spoke exclusively to CNN’s “Anderson Cooper 360″ on Monday night. She is the first juror to speak publicly about the case.

She said she believes Zimmerman’s “heart was in the right place” the night he shot Martin, but that he didn’t use “good judgment” in confronting the Florida teen.

“I think George Zimmerman is a man whose heart was in the right place, but just got displaced by the vandalism in the neighborhoods, and wanting to catch these people so badly that he went above and beyond what he really should have done,” she said.

Click here to read the full story on CNN.com.

CRENSHAW DISTRICT, Calif. (KTLA) — Demonstrators protesting the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial were marching down Crenshaw Boulevard on Monday night.
Aerials of the street showed the demonstrators walking in large groups, at times blocking traffic.

WASHINGTON — In a speech in Washington on Monday, Attorney General Eric Holder said the Justice Department would “continue to act in a manner that is consistent with the facts and the law” in examining what he called “the tragic, unnecessary shooting death of Trayvon Martin.”

“Independent of the legal determination that will be made, I believe that this tragedy provides yet another opportunity for our nation to speak honestly about the complicated and emotionally charged issues that this case has raised,” Holder said. “We must not – as we have too often in the past – let this opportunity pass.”

Click here to read more on CNN.com.

trayvon-protestsJust how much George Zimmerman’s murder trial polarized America was on full display once the verdict was read.

Across the country Sunday and early Monday, outraged protesters poured on to streets while supporters kept largely quiet. Protesters denounced the six-woman jury’s decision Saturday to find Zimmerman not guilty in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

While the vast majority of protests were peaceful, parts of Los Angeles grew tense.

Some protesters hurled flashlight batteries, rocks and chunks of concrete toward police in Los Angeles, police spokesman Andrew Smith said. Police responded by shooting bean bags at protesters.

Click here to read the full story on CNN.com.

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