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Egypt Turmoil: The Toppling of Morsy

CAIRO, Egypt — An uncertain new political order began to take shape in Egypt on Thursday, a day after the military deposed and reportedly detained the country’s first democratically elected president, put a top judge in his place and suspended the constitution.

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CAIRO — Opposition leader Mohamed ElBaradei has not been named Egypt’s prime minister, but is “the logical choice,” the interim president’s spokesman said Saturday, contradicting statements earlier in the day by officials in ElBaradei’s political party.

The move comes as anger grows among supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsy — including the Muslim Brotherhood — who have decried the military’s move to push him from power, and raised fears of widening violence.

ElBaradei met with interim President Adly Mansour for two hours Saturday afternoon, and “discussions and consultations are ongoing,” presidential adviser Ahmed al-Muslimani said on state-run TV.

“Tomorrow we expect to name the prime minister and the ministers.”

Read more at CNN.com.

CAIRO, Egypt — An uncertain new political order began to take shape in Egypt on Thursday, a day after the military deposed and reportedly detained the country’s first democratically elected president, put a top judge in his place and suspended the constitution.

Egypt Interim President Adly Mansour

File photo: Egypt’s Interim President Adly Mansour (Center)

The state-run Al-Ahram News reported that Egypt’s stock market surged 7% in the first hours of trading Thursday to a near two-month high.

Wednesday’s coup that toppled Mohamed Morsy prompted hundreds of thousands of people in the streets across Egypt to both applaud and assail the generals’ decision to step into the country’s political fray for the second time in slightly more than two years.

It also raised questions: What will happen to Morsy and his supporters, who insist he remains the country’s legitimate leader? Will violence blamed for the deaths Wednesday of at least 32 people spread? What hopes remain for Egypt’s attempts to build a multiparty democracy?

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Egypt’s military toppled the country’s first democratically elected president on Wednesday night, and installed the head of its highest court as interim leader, the nation’s top general announced.

MorsyGen. Abdel-Fatah El-Sisi said the military was fulfilling its “historic responsibility” to protect the country by ousting Mohamed Morsi, the Western-educated Islamist leader elected a year ago.

The country’s constitution was also suspended.

Morsi’s dramatic ouster came after days of massive street protests.

While many saw his removal as a continuation of Egypt’s 2011 revolution, the ex-president’s Islamist allies viewed it as a coup, and threatened retaliation.

President Obama said in a statement that he was “deeply concerned” by the day’s events and called on the Egyptian military to “move quickly and responsibly to return full authority back to a democratically elected civilian government as soon as possible through an inclusive and transparent process, and to avoid any arbitrary arrests of President Morsi and his supporters.”

Morsi rose to power after the country’s previous leader, Hosni Mubarak resigned in 2011, following weeks of protests and intense pressure.

Egypt won its independence from Britain after a 1952 revolution by army officers led by Gamal Abdel Nasser.

egypt-protest

Protesters rally in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.
(via CNN)

CAIRO, Egypt — Opponents and supporters of President Mohamed Morsy clashed violently at Cairo University, killing at least 16 people and wounding 200 more late Tuesday and early Wednesday, according to the state-run EgyNews agency.

Egypt’s army “will sacrifice our blood,” its leaders vowed Wednesday to defend the country just hours after President Mohamed Morsy refused to bow to an ultimatum they issued two days before: Find a solution to the deadly unrest sweeping the country or be pushed aside.

The statement posted on the official Facebook page of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces came as the clock ticked on the military’s plan to suspend Egypt’s constitution, dissolve the Islamist-led parliament and sideline the president, if Morsy does not find a way to end the unrest, military sources told Arab media and Reuters.

The military has given Morsy until 4 p.m. local time (10 a.m. ET ) to come up with a power-sharing agreement or face a military solution, the sources said.

Click here to read the full story on CNN.com.

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