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LA Dreamers: Our African American Pioneers

black-history-month

The celebration of Black History Month began back in 1926 and today the February tradition is still going strong.

To observe this important time — all month-long, KTLA will pay respect to ‘LA Dreamers – Our African-American Pioneers’.

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LOS ANGELES (KTLA) – We’re celebrating Black History Month by highlighting Southern California’s African-American Pioneers.

Today we take a look at one “LA Dreamer” who is still living the dream, singer-songwriter Stevie Wonder.

He’s one of the most creative musical talents in the twenty-first century and his influence is felt worldwide.

Stevie Wonder has written more than five hundred songs, has won twenty-six Grammy Awards and was elected to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Using his prestige to promote positivity, this civil rights activist played an instrumental role in making Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday a national holiday.

Wonder owns KJLH 102.3 FM, the first black-owned radio station on the West Coast.

This LA Dreamer continues to inspire kindness, joy, love and happiness.

To find out more about Stevie Wonder and other L.A. Dreamers, the Los Angeles Urban League has a special free exhibit called “The 90 That Built L.A.”

For more information, go to http://www.laul.org.

LOS ANGELES (KTLA) – We’re celebrating Black History Month by highlighting Southern California’s African-American Pioneers.

Today we’re honored to take a very special look at one “LA Dreamer” who turned his dreams into reality, City Councilman Bernard Parks.

As one of only two African-American police chiefs in Los Angeles history, Bernard Parks is a distinguished LA Dreamer.

The tough-minded Parks spent 38-years as an LAPD officer.

Under his resolute leadership as police chief, LA robberies and homicides plummeted by 45-percent. Rape declined by 20-percent.

After retiring from the force, the USC graduate never stopped serving his city.

Parks is now serving his third term as council member of LA’s 8th district.

Representing more than 250,000 people.

To find out more about Bernard Parks and other L.A. Dreamers, the Los Angeles Urban League has a special free exhibit called “The 90 That Built L.A.”

For more information, go to http://www.laul.org.

LOS ANGELES (KTLA) – We’re celebrating Black History Month by highlighting Southern California’s African-American Pioneers.

Today, KTLA’s Eric Spillman pays homage to the legacy of our very own Larry McCormick.

As one of the first African-American newscasters in the country, Larry McCormick was an L.A. dreamer who opened the door for generations.

A predominate force in the industry, McCormick was a broadcaster at KTLA for 33-years.

Showing his versatility, McCormick appeared in movies like Terminator 3 and SWAT. He also guest starred in television shows such as The Jeffersons, The Brady Bunch and Beverly Hills 90210.

Through it all, this consummate professional always gave back to the community.

To find out more about Larry McCormick and other L.A. Dreamers, the Los Angeles Urban League has a special free exhibit called “The 90 That Built L.A.”

For more information, go to www.laul.org.

LOS ANGELES (KTLA) – We’re celebrating Black History Month by highlighting Southern California’s African-American Pioneers.

Today, KTLA’s Michaela Pereira pays homage to John Mack, Former President of the Los Angeles Urban League.

Serving as president for 35 years Mack pushed for many changes in L.A.

Mack build the Los Angeles Urban League into one of the most successful non-profit organizations in the United States with an annual budget of 25-million dollars.

Throughout his career this civil rights advocate focused on jobs, education and youth development for minority communities.

This L.A. Dreamer is still working to move Los Angeles forward as Vice President of the Board of Police Commissioners for the LAPD.

To find out more about John Mack and other L.A. Dreamers, the Los Angeles Urban League has a special free exhibit called “The 90 That Built L.A.”

For more information, go to www.laul.org.

LOS ANGELES (KTLA) — We’re celebrating Black History Month by highlighting Southern California’s African-American pioneers.

Today, KTLA’s Gayle Anderson pays homage to Paul Williams, one of the finest architects of the modern era.

Williams was the first African-American to join the American Institute of Architects in 1923.

In order to overcome racism, Williams learned how to sketch upside down so his white clients would not feel uncomfortable sitting next to him.

This creative innovator designed homes for many celebrities, including singer Frank Sinatra and comedienne Lucille Ball.

He became known as the architect of the movie stars.

You can see his vision in the space-age theme building at LAX, the Beverly Hills Hotel and the First African Episcopal Methodist Church of Los Angeles.

To find out more about Paul Williams and other L.A. pioneers, the Los Angeles Urban League has a special exhibit called “The 90 That Built L.A.”

For more information, go to laul.org.

We’re continuing to celebrate Black History Month, as we highlight L.A. Dreamers — Southern California’s most powerful pioneers.

Today, KTLA’s Gayle Anderson remembers Biddy Mason, one of the first women to own land in Los Angeles.

Born into southern slavery in 1818, slave owners brought Mason to San Bernardino, California, in 1851.

The mother of three petitioned the court for her freedom and won it in 1856.

Driven to succeed, it took Mason 10 years as a free woman to acquire her first piece of property.

Known for her generosity, this savvy businesswoman accumulated a sizable fortune of $300,000 — a lot of money in her time.

She also co-founded L.A.’s first black church, First AME Church of Los Angeles.

Mason died in 1891. You can honor this L.A. Dreamer at Biddy Mason Park in downtown L.A. between Spring Street and Broadway.

If you’d like to find out more about Mason and other L.A. pioneers, the Los Angeles Urban League has a special free exhibit called “The 90 That Built L.A.”

For more information, go to www.laul.org.

The celebration of Black History Month began back in 1926 and today the February tradition is still going strong.

To observe this important time, all month-long, KTLA will pay respect to ‘L.A. Dreamers – Our African-American Pioneers.’

Tonight, we feature a profile of L.A’s first Black mayor, Tom Bradley.

To find out more about Tom Bradley and other L.A. Dreamers, the Los Angeles Urban League has a special free exhibit called ‘The 90 That Built LA’.

For more information go to laul.org.

The celebration of Black History Month began back in 1926 and today the February tradition is still going strong.

To observe this important time — all month-long, KTLA will pay respect to ‘LA Dreamers – Our African-American Pioneers’.

In this Vignette, Avi Bernard takes a look at the extraordinary commitment of Congresswoman Karen Bass.

To find out more about Karen Bass and other LA Dreamers, The Los Angeles Urban League has a special free exhibit called ‘The 90 That Built LA’.

For more information go to laul.org.

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