Silverado Fire Started by Resident Trying to Keep Animals Out of Garden: Officials

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The Silverado Fire was 80 percent contained as of Sept. 15, 2014. (Credit: KTLA)

The Silverado Fire, which has burned nearly 1,000 acres, was accidentally caused by a resident who was trying to keep animals out of a vegetable garden, officials said on Monday.

The blaze began at about 11 a.m. on Friday in the backyard of a home in the 30000 block of Silverado Canyon Road (map), according to Orange County Fire Authority officials.

The unidentified resident had apparently put metal sheeting around a wood border to keep the animals away, department Capt. Steve Concialdi said.

The fire was sparked when the sun reflected against the metal sheeting and then hit the wood rail tiles, according to Concialdi, who added that no charges were expected to be filed.

The fire was 80 percent contained Monday, a day after the fire’s size was downgraded to 968 acres and mandatory evacuation orders were lifted.

The fire was originally estimated to have burned 1,600 acres, but improved maps led to the updated estimate, according to a post on the federal interagency website InciWeb.

It was located in the mountains of Cleveland National Forest south of Corona.

Six firefighters had been injured while battling the fire, mostly due to heat-related injuries, Concialdi said.

No civilians were reportedly injured and no homes were damaged.

Mandatory evacuations impacting at least 217 homes went into effect Friday night and were lifted Sunday.

Residents were asked to show identification and proof of residency when returning home, Inciweb stated.

Motorists were also asked to drive slowly and be aware of public safety equipment in the area.

A high of 105 degrees with 30 percent humidity and winds of 4 to 10 mph were expected in the Silverado Canyon area Monday, according to the National Weather Service.

Temperatures were expected to decrease to about 100 degrees by Wednesday, with a 20 percent chance of rain that night.