Rain Causes Debris, Rockslides to Close Nearly 10 Miles of PCH in Ventura County

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Multiple vehicles became trapped and about 10 miles of the Pacific Coast Highway in Ventura County was closed due to a rockslide Sunday - the first day of a storm expected to bring heavy rainfall to Southern California.

Over a foot of debris, rocks and dirt covered the Pacific Coast Highway after rainfall on Nov. 30, 2014. (Credit: KTLA)

Over a foot of debris, rocks and dirt covered the Pacific Coast Highway after rainfall on Nov. 30, 2014. (Credit: KTLA)

Debris on the coastal roadway ranged from a few inches to over a foot high between Las Posas Road and Yerba Buena Road (map), according to officials.

The closure was expected to last until at least Monday, the California Department of Transportation tweeted.

The debris caused two vehicles to became stranded around 4:50 p.m. on PCH near Deer Creek Road, according to Ventura County Fire Department spokesman Mike Lindbery.

The occupants were able exit the vehicles and no one was injured, he stated.

One of the vehicles was removed while the second was disabled and left, Lindbery tweeted.

Rain was expected in Los Angeles and Ventura counties Sunday and was set to continue for several days, with the heaviest rainfall likely coming Tuesday and possibly lingering into Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service.

Coastal and valley areas were likely to receive 1 to 2 inches of rain while foothill and mountain areas could get 2 to 5 inches, NWS stated.

Heavy rainfall was expected to cause hazardous driving conditions and possibly bring flash floods to recent burn areas, including those near the Springs and Colby Fire.

Nearly 10 miles of Pacific Coast Highway closed Nov. 30, 2014, after rain caused debris to cover the roadway. (Credit: KTLA)

Nearly 10 miles of Pacific Coast Highway closed Nov. 30, 2014, after rain caused debris to cover the roadway. (Credit: KTLA)

Areas near the Colby Fire, which burned nearly 2,000 acres of the San Gabriel Mountains, were put on a yellow alert status Sunday afternoon, according to the Glendora Police Department.

The alert did not include evacuations, but urged residents in the area to respect rain-related parking restrictions, and to remove vehicles, trash bins and other obstructions from the roadways.

The warning came just over a week after rain caused mudslides in parts of Glendora, damaging one home.

The NWS also stated areas near the Springs Fire, which scorched about 28,000 acres of the Santa Monica Mountains in 2013, could be affected.

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