Flash Flood Warning Expires in SoCal After ‘Good Winter Storm’

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Residents and officials in Glendora and Silverado Canyon breathed a sigh of relief as a flash flood watch expired Thursday morning.

Sandbags are seen outside a home in Glendora, where January's Colby Fire left a burn area vulnerable to mudslides. (Credit: KTLA)

Sandbags are seen outside a home in Glendora, where January's Colby Fire left a burn area vulnerable to mudslides. (Credit: KTLA)

The two areas, where thousands of acres were burned earlier this year in the Colby and Silverado fires, respectively, were vulnerable to mudslides and flooding during a Pacific storm that dropped record amounts of rainfall on parts of Southern California, officials said.

The flash flood watch expired at 8:30 a.m., according to the National Weather Service.

"This was as low impact of a storm as you can get," Kathy Noxsie, a meteorologist with the weather service, told the Los Angeles Times. "There was very little wind, steady rain, no pounding rain that would have caused problems like flooding. It was a good winter storm."

In Glendora and Silverado Canyon, extensive preparations had taken place before and during the storm, which prompted voluntary evacuation orders. Homeowners and work crews filled thousands of sandbags, as police and fire officials monitored roadways for debris. No major incidents were reported.

Some residents of Riverside County were not as fortunate: a burst of heavy rain early Thursday morning prompted mudflows in Hemet, San Jacinto and Gilman Springs, where dozens were rescued from stranded vehicles. No one was injured, fire officials said.

Notice: you are using an outdated browser. Microsoft does not recommend using IE as your default browser. Some features on this website, like video and images, might not work properly. For the best experience, please upgrade your browser.