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Hit-and-Run Driver Sought After Striking Woman in Echo Park Crosswalk

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Police are searching for a hit-and-run driver who struck an 18-year-old woman as she was walking in a crosswalk in Echo Park Wednesday night.

An 18-year-old was struck by a hit-and-run driver in Echo Park Wednesday night. (Credit: Loudlabs)

An 18-year-old was struck by a hit-and-run driver in Echo Park Wednesday night. (Credit: Loudlabs)

The woman was crossing northbound on West Temple Street at the Patton Street intersection (map) at about 9:40 p.m. when she was struck, Lt. Nate Williams with the Los Angeles Police Department said.

Witness Jose Rincon said he was driving along side another car when he saw two people — a man and a woman — crossing the street.

Rincon slowed down but said the other driver did not.

“He sped up when he saw them crossing and he hit the girl … the girl went flying,” Rincon said.

After the crash, Rincon said he put on his emergency lights to alert other drivers.

The victim, who was said to be a transient, was taken to USC Medical Center in stable condition, according to Williams.

An 18-year-old was struck by a hit-and-run driver in Echo Park Wednesday night. (Credit: Loudlabs)

An 18-year-old was struck by a hit-and-run driver in Echo Park Wednesday night. (Credit: Loudlabs)

She was conscious and speaking, Williams said.

The driver that struck the woman fled the scene in his vehicle, according to Williams.

It was described as a dark blue or black Honda Civic with tinted windows and no license plate.

The crash comes one day after the Los Angeles City Council approved an automatic reward system for hit-and-run crashes.

Rewards will be automatically offered with amounts varying based on the severity of the crime, as follows:

  • $50,000 for a fatal injury;
  • $25,000 for a permanent, serious injury as defined in section 20001(d) of the vehicle code;
  • $5,000 for an injury other than a “permanent serious injury”; and
  • $1,000 for property damage.

KTLA’s Crystal Garcia contributed to this report.