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Overlooked Navy Veteran Honored in Huntington Beach Decades After His Death at Pearl Harbor

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After several decades -- and a major oversight -- a U.S. Navy veteran who died at Pearl Harbor finally received the proper recognition Tuesday in his hometown of Huntington Beach.

Ardenne Allen (A.A.) "Bill" Woodward is seen in a photograph displayed during a ceremony in his honor in Huntington Beach on June 10, 2015. (Credit: KTLA)

Ardenne Allen (A.A.) "Bill" Woodward is seen in a photograph displayed during a ceremony in his honor in Huntington Beach on June 10, 2015. (Credit: KTLA)

Navy sailor Ardenne Allen (A.A.) "Bill" Woodward, only 20 years old at the time, was one of more than 1,100 service members killed on the USS Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

More than 70 years later, Woodward's name was finally added to the City of Huntington Beach's veterans memorial and revealed during a ceremony held on what would have been his 94th birthday.

The oversight was first noticed by a local historian who saw Woodward's name in a "Life" magazine article and realized he should be on the city's memorial wall.

Karen Richardson is seen during a ceremony held for her father, who died in the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Credit: KTLA)

Karen Richardson is seen during a ceremony held for her father, who died in the attack on Pearl Harbor. (Credit: KTLA)

During Tuesday's ceremony, Woodward’s daughter Karen Richardson sat just a few feet away as love letters her father wrote to her mother, Virginia, were read.

In one of the letters, Woodward expressed his desire to see his wife, who was back in Huntington Beach, and wrote bout the couple’s baby daughter he never met.

“Oh darling, I can hardly wait to see her as I have dreamed and thought of her so terribly much,” one of the letters, written just five days before the attack, read.

The City of Huntington Beach's veterans memorial is seen on June 10, 2015. (Credit: KTLA)

The City of Huntington Beach's veterans memorial is seen on June 10, 2015. (Credit: KTLA)