Group Seeks Referendum to Overturn Just-Signed California Assisted Suicide Law

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A day after Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill allowing assisted suicides for the terminally ill in California, opponents filed papers to seek a referendum to overturn the measure on the November 2016 ballot.

A group called Seniors Against Suicide filed papers with the state attorney general’s office to get an official title and summary for the referendum, the first step toward collecting signatures.

The group would have 90 days, or until Jan. 3, to collect the signatures of 365,880 registered voters, a difficult task as those behind a failed referendum on the state’s new vaccine law recently found out.

“Illness is never a reason for ending a life,” said the letter from clinical psychologist Mark Hoffman to the attorney general. He said in the letter he is “working with other opponents of medically killing depressed and ill patients.”

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