Manhattan Woman Sues Nephew for $127,000 After Breaking Her Wrist During 8-Year-Old’s Hug

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A woman who sued her 12-year-old nephew for $127,000 after his hug allegedly caused her to fall and break her wrist four years ago was entitled to no money, a Connecticut jury ruled Tuesday afternoon.

The six-member jury in Bridgeport deliberated for about 20 minutes before reaching its decision, the Connecticut Post reported.

On Friday, Jennifer Connell had testified against Sean Tarala, who was accompanied to the hearing by his father and appeared confused, the newspaper reported. The boy's mother died last year.

The 54-year-old New York woman told the court she loved her nephew, but that he should be held responsible in the case.

The lawsuit alleged the minor child's "negligence and carelessness" resulted in the Connell's injuries and subsequent losses.

The hug occurred March 18, 2011, when Connell showed up at the Taralas' Westport home for the boy's birthday party.  Sean, then 8, was riding his brand-new bicycle when he noticed his aunt.

He ran toward her, enthusiastically shouting, "Auntie Jen, I love you," according to court testimony.

Connell's 50-pound nephew jumped into her arms, sending the two tumbling to the ground, she testified.  The fall injured her, but "it was his birthday party and I didn't want to upset him," she said, according to the newspaper.

Connell described her life in a third-floor Upper East Side walk-up as being "very difficult" since that day.

She claimed her social life has taken a serious hit as well.

"I was at a party recently, and it was difficult to hold my hors d'oeuvre plate," Connell said.

The lawsuit stated that "a reasonable eight years(sic) old under those circumstances would know or should have known that a forceful greeting such as the one delivered by the defendant to the plaintiff could cause the harms and losses suffered by the plaintiff."

As the verdict against her was read, Connell reportedly showed no emotion inside the courtroom. After, she asked for judicial marshals to escort her outside and past the throng of media that had gathered by the courthouse.

She ignored their requests for comment on the case, the paper reported.

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