Latest Storms Are Filling Reservoirs, Deepening Snowpack

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Ever since a series of winter storms began dumping rain and snow in Northern California last year, officials have been looking for tangible signs that all those storms were making a dent in the state’s four-year drought.

The sun sets over Shasta Lake August 30, 2014 in Shasta Lake, California. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The sun sets over Shasta Lake August 30, 2014 in Shasta Lake, California. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

This week delivered some pretty powerful evidence.

The latest storms over the weekend pushed California’s biggest reservoir past its historical average for mid-March and put the second-largest one at its historical average, officials said.

The rising reservoirs, along with growing snowpack in the Sierra Nevada, are important because both are key sources of water for California.

Click here to read the full story on LATimes.com.

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