For the First Time, Federal Judge Allows Former CIA Detainees to Sue Over Torture

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The logo of the Central Intelligence Agency is seen at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia, April 13, 2016. (Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

The logo of the Central Intelligence Agency is seen at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia, April 13, 2016. (Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

For the first time, a federal judge is letting a civil lawsuit proceed against two CIAcontract psychologists who designed and supervised brutal interrogation tactics that critics called torture.

The ruling allows two former CIA detainees and the family of another who died in agency custody to try to win damages in federal court for the abuse they suffered at then-secret CIA prisons in the early 2000s.

In a ruling from the bench at federal district court in Spokane, Wash., Senior Judge Justin L. Quackenbush said he would deny a motion to dismiss the lawsuit against James E. Mitchell and Bruce Jessen.

According to the lawsuit and a Senate Intelligence Committee report, the mistreatment included waterboarding, sleep deprivation, confinement in small boxes, rectal feeding and beatings.

Click here to read the full story on LATimes.com.