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Uber Broke California Law by Concealing Massive Data Breach, L.A. City Attorney Alleges in Lawsuit

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The logo of the ride-sharing service Uber in front of its headquarters in San Francisco. (Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

The logo of the ride-sharing service Uber in front of its headquarters in San Francisco. (Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

For more than a year, Uber Technologies Inc. concealed a massive hack that exposed the personal data of millions of drivers and riders, violating a California law that requires companies to promptly report such breaches, according to a lawsuit filed Monday by Los Angeles City Attorney Mike Feuer.

In October 2016, hackers stole the names, cellphone numbers and email addresses of more than 57 million riders across the world, as well as driver’s license numbers for 600,000 Uber drivers in the United States. Uber disclosed the hack last month.

Feuer filed the lawsuit in Los Angeles County Superior Court on behalf of California residents. The case will focus on Uber’s failure to disclose the data breach to Uber’s California drivers, he said.

California law requires companies to report hacks “in the most expedient time possible” and “without unreasonable delay” when some forms of personal data, including driver’s license numbers, are compromised. The law is designed to help consumers fight identity theft.

Read the full story on LATimes.com