Immigrant Children Aren’t Entitled to Government-Paid Lawyers in Deportation Hearings, Federal Court Rules

A federal appeals court decided unanimously Monday that minor immigrants who are in the country without legal authorization are not entitled to government-paid lawyers in hearings that could lead to their deportation.

A view of the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on June 12, 2017 in San Francisco. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A view of the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on June 12, 2017 in San Francisco. (Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld an immigration judge’s decision to deny asylum to a minor identified as C.J.L.G., who left Honduras at age 13 after being threatened by gangs.

The boy did not have a lawyer, and his mother was unable to find free legal help.

The 9th Circuit said federal law did not guarantee paid lawyers for children in immigration court and that the teenage boy failed to show that he needed a lawyer to safeguard his rights.

Read the full story on LATimes.com