After Las Vegas Massacre, Congress Has Failed to Act

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For once, a mass shooting seemed to create a bipartisan consensus — rare in the polarized debate over gun control — that something had to change.

A bump stock device (left), is shown next to a AK-47 semi-automatic rifle (right). (Credit: George Frey/Getty Images)

A bump stock device (left), is shown next to a AK-47 semi-automatic rifle (right). (Credit: George Frey/Getty Images)

In the days after a gunman killed 58 people at an outdoor country music festival on the Las Vegas Strip in October, members of Congress set their sights on “bump stocks,” devices that allow a semiautomatic firearm to mimic a fully automatic one.

Lawmakers called for more regulation of bump stocks and even outright bans. They vowed — Democrats and Republicans alike — to make the issue a legislative priority.

But that was then.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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